December 21, 2014

music for the 4. Sunday of Advent – Samuel Capricornus: Adeste omnes fideles

by ada

I had grandiose plans for today’s music post – too bad I’ve had neither time nor energy to fulfill them. So, to make the best out of this situation, let’s listen to the motet Adeste omnes fideles composed by Samuel Capricornus; moved a lot, wrote cool music, died young. My kind of guy.

December 20, 2014

Wien – Christmas market at Belvedere

by ada

Belvedere 34

Belvedere 25

Belvedere 15

Belvedere 17

Belvedere 23

Belvedere 24

Belvedere 21

Belvedere 19

Belvedere 30

Belvedere 3

December 14, 2014

music for the 3. Sunday of Advent – Johann Stadlmayr: Resonet in laudibus

by ada

Something short and sweet for Gaudete, the 3rd Sunday of Advent: the Christmas motet Resonet in laudibus, from the collection Moduli symphoniaci, in augustissima Christi nati celebritate et caeteris deinceps natalibus, et Purificatae Virginis, feriis, quinis, senis, septenis et pluribus vocibus concinendi of Johann Stadlmayr, published in 1629 in Innsbruck.

And, although Stadlmayr has only spent four years of his life in Salzburg (1603-1607), I’m determined to squeeze him also into the Salzburg Series, because I’m tricky as hell.

I can’t share a lot of interesting details about his life but the fact that he worked as a kind of butcher for six years, because he was unable to make a living out of music. Familiar situation, isn’t it? I love you, Johann Stadlmayr, you are my soulmate and bff forever.

December 12, 2014

Wien – the tree lights at the Wiener Christkindlmarkt

by ada

Rathasuplatz Vienna Christmas

Christmas lights at Rathausplatz Vienna 1

red heart shaped Christmas hearts at Rathausplatz Vienna

Vienna Rathausplatz Christmas lights

Christmas lights at Rathausplatz Vienna

Gummi bear lights at Rathausplatz Vienna 2

two violin-shaped Christmas lights at Rathausplatz Vienna 1

violin-shaped Christmas lights at Rathausplatz Vienna

December 11, 2014

Wien

by ada

Rotenturmstrasse

December 8, 2014

a cure for the spleen or, amusement for a winter’s evening

by ada

Sziget Eye 8

mulled wine 1

Hungarian sausage 1

pita 2

Hungarian pottery

food 3

fair

mulled wine 4

alcohol

food

Sziget Eye 5

December 7, 2014

music for the 2. Sunday of Advent – Michel Corrette: Sinfonia V. from 6 Symphonies en quatuor, contenant les plus beaux Noëls François & étrangers

by ada

For the second Sunday of Advent let’s get back into my comfort zone padded with late(-ish) French Baroque music, and listen to one of the Christmas symphonies of Michel Corrette, obsessive writer of DIY music treatises, knight of the Order of Christ, cultivator of the beau berger mindset that flourished in the social circles of the 17th-18th century French noblesse and, last but not least, composer of noëls and other funny things, such as concertos with titles like La Femme est une grand embarras or La Servante au bon Tabac. 

Noëls are the traditional Christmas carols of the French, and back in those times it was a thing amongst French composers to write variations based upon them for the organ, but (to my best knowledge) it was Corrette whom first occurred to bind a few of them together as a set and use it as a symphony. Here is No 5 of the 6 Symphonies en quatuor, contenant les plus beaux Noëls François & étrangers, avec des variations pour un 1er violon ou flûte, un 2d violon, alto & basse chiffrée, & pouvant s’exécuter à gr. orchestre à l’Office divin, published in Paris in 1781. Its last movement is based on the melody that was well-known in Baroque Europe under various names, such as Fuggi, fuggi, fuggi; La Mantovana and Noël Suisse. Today most people recognise it as the melody of Hatikvah, the national anthem of Israel.*

* If when I’m done with the Salzburg Series and all my other series I’m dreaming of doing in my (nonexistent) free hours, like the Musica Hebraica, the Folia, the Female Baroque Composers, the Love, War and Death, etc, etc, I’m definitely doing a post on the early music background of Hatikvah. It’s not a long story to tell, so there is actually some hope of this happening, haha**

** hopefully I will still live blog at age 83***

*** Telemann, Schütz and even Corrette were still mentally fit and active around that age so nothing is impossible

December 6, 2014

Budapest – Semmelweis Orvostörténeti Múzeum (Semmelweis Museum of Medical History), part 2

by ada

craniotomy skull

old ampules

Egésséget 2

ammonia pura

Fabini Tofor

old glasses at Semmelweis Museum Budapest 5

old laboratory glass jar at Semmelweis Museum Budapest

house pharmacy

washing bin

ground Semmelweis Museum

old medical instruments at Semmelweis Museum Budapest 10

o

old med instruments 7

old medical instruments at Semmelweis Museum Budapest 1

old med instruments 9

old injection needle

old watch 3

old reanimation tools

old printing at Semmelweis Museum Budapest 2

contemporary art piece at Semmelweis Museum Budapest

December 6, 2014

Budapest – Semmelweis Orvostörténeti Múzeum (Semmelweis Museum of Medical History), part 1

by ada

Semmelweis' grave 5

Avicenna 8

Hippocrates 1

old coin at Semmelweis Museum Budapest

Semmelweis' room 8

dining room

painting at Semmelweis Múzeum Budapest 1

old pharmacy 3

old pharmacy 1

sculpture at Semmelweis Museum Budapest 2

old map at Semmelweis Múzeum Budapest

anatomy doll 5

acupuncture doll at Semmelweis Museum Budapest

Chinese pill box at Semmelweis Museum Budapest 3

Chinese drawing

small hand

Semmelweis Museum Budapest

Semmelweis Múzeum 8

wax doll at Semmelweis Museum Budapest 4

anatomy wax doll Semmelweis Museum Budapest 11

December 3, 2014

a matter of concentration

by ada

old med instruments

old med instruments 3

Untitled 309

Untitled 307

December 2, 2014

done laid around, done stayed around this old town too long

by ada

Bp 1

ich

December 1, 2014

Budapest – Várkert Bazár

by ada

Várkert Bazár 1

Untitled 14

Untitled 11

November 30, 2014

music for the 1. Sunday of Advent – Heinrich Schütz: Rorate coeli desuper from Kleine Geistliche Konzerte II, SWV 322

by ada

Advent arrived unexpectedly quickly this year and it makes me feel somewhat betrayed. I was so busy with seriously time-consuming life events like taking – and passing – exams, changing jobs and moving between countries, that I had no time for autumn-related delights. I’m also in denial about it being winter already, so I have yet to find my usual enthusiasm for Christmas music.

Considering that I’m no fan of the music of Heinrich Schütz, his motet Rorate coeli desuper from the second book of his collection Kleine geistliche Concerte may not be the best place to start, but we all have to start somewhere. And there is nothing wrong with Schütz. He, besides being one of the most important composers in the history of Early German Baroque music and an important milestone on its – in no way linear – development, was also the composer of the first German opera, Dafne. He was excellent in so many ways I can’t count but all his merits and praiseworthy compositional accomplishments are not enough to make me not hear the modal tunes of Renaissance polyphony in his music. And I just don’t like Renaissance polyphony. I really dislike it. All those madrigals based on modal counterpoint, and such. Definitely not my thing.

And while Schütz certainly did his best to get away from prima prattica and earned his fame as parens nostrae musicae modernae totally justly exactly for doing that, he is not quite there yet. But it’s no long journey to go; only a few decades to wait until Dietrich Buxtehude nails it completely and musica poetica becomes a tool for channelling human emotions instead of being an intellectual dictionary for the practitioners of musical rhetorics.

And now, after my exhaustive attempts to make it really clear why I don’t like this piece, let’s finally listen to it. It is quite sweet, actually.

November 29, 2014

November comes and November goes

by ada

Ape month.

November readings

November 28, 2014

Wien

by ada

wien

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