how to make traditional duck gribenes

by ada

Don’t worry, there’s no danger of me becoming a food blogger. Actually, I’m painfully low-maintenance when it comes to food. Before going paleo you could find me eating pasta and tomato sauce on six days a week without getting bored with it. It’s not that I don’t like a good meal, because I rather do, but I just don’t have that big interest in food, neither in eating nor in producing. Let’s put it this way: if somebody else cooks delicious things for me, I happily eat them. If nobody cooks for me, I don’t miss it.

Since switching to the paleo diet I became a bit more interested in what I eat, or, well, at least in the health side of the story. I try to cook every day and eat a variety of foods I didn’t try before. That’s how I ended up with a whole duck (for half price) yesterday, and since our homemade goose gribenes is one of my favourite food since childhood, I decided to give a try to the duck version. And I did what every girl does when in trouble: called my mother for the recipe. They turned out really yummy, but really, I mean, really YUMMY. So I dedicate this post to document this very culinary success of mine (which are oh so very rare, haha.)

Since English is not my first language (not even the second, in fact), I wasn’t able to figure out what’s the proper English word for gribenes. “Cracklings”? “Greaves”? I really don’t feel the difference. One thing is sure: it’s not “pork rinds”, because, well , it’s not pork it’s made of.

Take a duck (goose, chicken are optional), pull its skin off and together with its fat, cut it into small pieces.

duck fat

Put it in a pot with one tablespoon water under it and cook it really slow for about three hours. Don’t cover the pot. If you live in an open space apartment where kitchen, living room and bedroom share the same twenty square metres (like I do), be anxious to close your wardrobe doors, put your coats outside and open the windows. Otherwise you will end up smelling like a giant piece of roasted duck (like I did), which may be appetising for your cat but rather embarrassing for the humans you meet later during the day.

duck fat

While it cooks, it looks like this:

duck gribenes

Later on:

duck gribenes

When the pieces are crispy enough not to make funny noises when pushing them to the side of the pot, you can pour the fat in glass containers and put it in the fridge to cool. So does it look when it’s still warm:

duck fat

And so it does when already solid:

duck fat

The gribenes look like this:

duck gribenes

I mean, like this!

duck gribenes

Eat them when they are still warm and crispy, with bread spread with the fresh duck fat, with fresh spring onions with salt. Or eat them as a snack.

duck gribenes

Well, after writing this post I feel like I’m one of those big paleo bloggers with ten thousands of subscribers who create amazing gluten-free recipes, make homemade coconut deodorants and share their experiences of going no ‘poo. Only that those big paleo bloggers would never eat that occasional slice of bread I still do sometimes, ehem.

duck gribenes

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