Archive for March, 2013

March 31, 2013

March is the month of expectations…

by ada

… that never come true, haha. I thought my intellectual life couldn’t go worse, but well, it did. In March, I managed to finish exactly two books or, well, actually only one and a half, because one of them I started reading already in February. And no, I haven’t been watching movies either. Not a single one. What I actually did in my spare time, I don’t even remember. I was sleeping it through, I guess. I wonder if I will ever be “me” again or I’ll remain this strange creature of compromises and indifference who I became through the depression, forever.

Another depression post for the most joyful day of the year, yep.

March readings

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March 31, 2013

music for Easter Sunday – Der Himmel lacht, die Erde jubilieret, BWV 31 by Johann Sebastian Bach

by ada

Today’s music is the first choir, Der Himmel lacht, die Erde jubilieret from the cantata of the same title, written by Johann Sebastian Bach for the Easter Sunday of the year 1715, during his Weimar years. I wish I could identify myself with its jubilant atmosphere but well, neither the Heaven laughs nor does the Earth exult, because it actually snows again and I’m already so sick of this winter, it really feels like giving up, lying down and dying. Not exactly that brassy resurrexit-feeling one would like to have on Easter Sunday.

P.S.: Last year’s post was something Hungarian: Surrexit Christus hodie by Esterházy Pál. You can listen to it  here.

March 30, 2013

Salzburg – Grünmarkt

by ada

eggs at Grünmarkt

tulips

strawberries

Salzburg Grünmarkt cheese

Salzburg Grünmarkt

bread crumbles

daffodils

Jause

ducks

flowers

plants

dog at Residenzplatz

willow catkin

flowers

March 30, 2013

music for Holy Saturday – Jan Dismas Zelenka: Miserere in с, ZWV 57

by ada

For Holy Saturday (or Great Saturday as we call it in Hungary) is a music that was never intended to be part of the Easter liturgy: the first movement of Jan Dismas Zelenka‘s Miserere, my favourite Miserere of all times. Zelenka is the man I’m seriously planning to marry ever since I’ve first heard his music (that tells a lot about how stormy my love life lately is) (well, at least it isn’t an imaginary affair, because he definitely did exist) (some three hundred years ago, ehem). He was also highly valued by Johann Sebastian Bach who even asked him for some professional advice on composing. And that means something, I dare say. So it’s not just some girly crush – Zelenka was really that cool.

P.S.: Last year’s post about the cantatas Boi Beshalom and Kol HaNeshama by Cristiano Giuseppe Lidarti.

March 29, 2013

music for Good Friday – Aria “Es ist vollbracht” from Passio Secundum Johannem, BWV 245 by Johann Sebastian Bach

by ada

Today’s music ist the aria Es ist vollbracht from the St. John’s Passion of Johann Sebastian Bach. It doesn’t need any comments.

P.S.: Find last year’s Good Friday post, Maria (sopra la Carpinese) here.

March 28, 2013

music for Maundy Thursday – Francesco Antonio Rosetti: Jesus in Gethsemane

by ada

Today’s music is the oratorio Jesus in Gethsemane by Francesco Antonio Rosetti, also called Franz Anton Rösler, a Classical era composer of Bohemian origin who was found worth of mentioning beside names as Mozart and Haydn by Charles Burney, the famous English travelling music historian of the late 18th century. Rosetti’s life bears a slight resemblance with that of Mozart: they both were successful (yes, Mozart was successful during his lifetime, everything else you hear is nothing but urban legend), didn’t have the less feeling for money and died young.

I intended to post his other oratorio, Der sterbende Jesus, which was a big hit in Rosetti’s days, but, well, it seems that YouTube is not the place where one goes for historical performance practice research. I should better look for videos with titles like “Adorable 6 Year Old playing Jingle Bells on the recorder while belly dancing in a living room in Oklahoma city” if I need some sense of achievement.

P.S.: You can listen to last year’s Maundy Thursday post, Agonia di Cristo (Le Ultime Sette Parole) from Niccolò Jommelli, here.

P.S.2.: Just a reminder: whether Jommelli’s nor Rosetti’s music fits my own category of high Baroque. Maundy Thursday makes me crave Classical harmonies.

March 27, 2013

music for Holy Wednesday – Michel-Richard Delalande: IIIe Leçon du Mercredi Saint, S. 118

by ada

Last year I posted the world’s most beautiful Tenebrae musicTroisième Leçon de Ténèbres pour deux voix from the harpsichord teacher and court composer of Louis XIV, François Couperin. It’s a piece that’s really difficult to outbid. Fortunately French Baroque church music is overloaded with great compositions (so much that it makes me feel overwhelmed and troubled, actually). Originally I wanted to write about Michel Lambert, the composer of countless airs de cour, who wrote the first Leçons de ténèbres ever, as soon as 1662, but unfortunately YouTube is totally ignorant of the unique importance of his work so I just randomly picked one from another royal harpsichord teacher, Michel-Richard Delalande, who is famous for winning a composers’ competition that’s judge was XIV Louis, only and alone. Let’s speak about the role of totalitarian regimes in the evolution of music, haha.

March 27, 2013

Venice – day 2

by ada

acqua alta

acqua alta

San Marco

me

after the rain

love locks on Ponte dell' Accademia

Rialto

rainy Venice streets

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sunset in Venice

March 26, 2013

music for Holy Tuesday – Georg Philipp Telemann: Brockes Passion TWV 5:1

by ada

I have to admit, to pick out only one piece a day from all the beauty that was composed for the Holy Week  is very difficult indeed, even if I restrict myself to those approximately 60 years we call “high Baroque”. I was never good at making decisions and it rapidly got worse with the depression – it’s a pain every time, actually. Mostly I just let things pass and I go with what remains, but sometimes it just doesn’t work. So after a day of hesitation I gave in and chose another famous composer. This time it’s Georg Philipp Telemann, a musician whom I really admire. I wrote about him earlier, so I don’t do it now – writing about music makes me nervous right now, and it’s nothing I was really prepared for. Hope this mood will pass till tomorrow, because Holy Wednesday is French Lamentation Day, and I would  regret if I missed it because of some stupid depression issues.

So for today is an excerpt from Telemann’s Brockes Passion, named after the librettist Barthold Heinrich Brockes. It’s the virtuoso recorder part that made me post it.

P.S.: You can find last year’s music for Holy Tuesday, Stabat Mater from Giovanni Felice Sances, here.

March 26, 2013

the Venice memories – at night

by ada

small square in Venice

window in Venice

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Grand Canal

Rialto by night

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Grand Canal by night

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March 25, 2013

Liebster Blog Award

by ada

I was nominated for some awesome blog awards by some awesome bloggers lately and since I have four free days in a row to spend in pyjamas and writing blog posts (yes, more photos of Venice are to come!) (besides the daily Holy Week Music History Series, of course, which nobody ever reads) (yes, that’s exactly what it sounds, an accusation), I decided to slowly start answering all those complicated questions that seem to come with blog awards.

The Liebster Blog (an award clearly of German descent) comes from lovely Federica, a fellow sufferer from the famous Dutch weather.  She honoured me with it some, well, nine months ago. Ehem. That tells everything that needs to be told about my social abilities.

The rules are:

  • post 11 facts about yourself
  • answer the 11 questions the blogger who nominated you has given you
  • nominate 5 bloggers with less than 200 followers and tell them about it
  • make 11 questions for the people you are nominating

My facts:

1. I kept a strictly vegetarian diet for four years. It wasn’t a decision – I just stopped eating meat after my dog died of spinal cord cancer. During those four years I never missed meat. And then, on a random day I felt like okay, let’s try it, and since then, I’m back on the carnivore trail.

2. I sleep on my stomach. Always. It’s the only position I ever fall asleep.

3. I’m one of those terrible fresh air fanatics that get nervous if they have all windows closed around them. I sleep with open windows through almost the whole year.

4. I sleep in socks. Well, with the windows open it’s usually rather necessary.

5. At the age of three I was bitten by a pine marten at the zoo of Veszprém. It could have been a tiger!

6. I was born to be a natural shaman – I have more bones than the most of you. I’m still figuring out what to make out of it. The possibilities for modern shamans are endless.

7. At the age of 18 I seriously wanted to be a Franciscan nun. Maybe I did become one in a parallel universe.

8. I have butterfly stickers on my walls.

9. I don’t shampoo my hair since two years. What I use are baking soda and apple cider vinegar. Recently I was trying out some Rhassoul powder, and it’s amazing, but, well, baking soda is cheaper. There were also times when I didn’t wash my hair at all (the same times when I visited McDonald’s wearing my pyjamas) (oh, those precious depression months, they made me learn to appreciate small successes. I managed to go out, even if I didn’t manage to get properly dressed).

10. I also don’t use soap (or any artificial cleanser) on my face. I’m doing the oil cleansing method since almost two years. Best decision ever.

11. I’m gluten-free, dairy-free and sugar-free. Well, on most days. Just don’t take notice of my ice-cream photos.

Now you all have a pretty clear picture about my digestion, sleeping habits and beauty routine. And my depression, of course. Don’t forget my depression.

Federica’s questions were:

1. Do you believe in Destiny? – Actually, no. Some things in life just doesn’t make sense and we should accept that.

2. Would you ever like to get married? – It depends. At this moment, no. But, well, I’m not in love right now.

3. Cats or dogs? – Cats and dogs.

4. If you had to bring back a famous person from the past, who would you choose? – I feel that I should mention Bach or Mozart here but whom I really would like to meet once more is my grandmother who died when I was thirteen.

5. What do you think will happen December 21st, 2012? – Well, what did actually happen on December 21st, 2012? I was shopping for Christmas and wrote blog posts about the shadowy side of being Hungarian.

6. Do you drink coffee? – Yes. I definitely do.

7. What’s your favorite cake? – I have no favorite cake. Unbelievable but true.

8. Why did you start blogging? – I started writing my Hungarian blog in my first year in The Hague because I felt lonely. This blog I started to host my project 365.

9. What was/is your favorite high-school subject? – I was in a class specialised in biology and mathematics and I hated high-school with my very heart. Most of the time I didn’t even visit school, so let us just forget this question very quickly, please.

10. What’s the last country you visited?  – Italy.

11. How often do you check out my blog? – I follow your blog on WordPress so I get every new post per mail.

My 5 nominees: 

For this award I’ve chosen bloggers whose theme is (mostly) Hungary. I don’t bother myself with finding out the amount of followers they have – mostly it’s not public anyway. I nominate bloggers whose work I like for one reason or another. My nomination is not obligatory, so if one of you doesn’t like to participate, answer my questions or share things about himself/herself, please feel free to ignore me. Of course I’m happier if you don’t ignore me, haha.

1. Andrei Stavilă’s photoblog.

2. Linnea from A year in Budapest.

3. Leopold and his friends from hold the camera.

4. István from Konceptofon.

5. William Lower from Three Years on Mars.

My questions: 

1. How (or why) did you end up living in Budapest?

2. Do you have a pet?

3. How often did you move during your life?

4. In how many countries have you lived yet? I mean lived, not travelled.

5. In which ones?

6. What was your first word as a baby?

7. Your favourite Hungarian food?

8. What’s the colour of the socks you’re wearing right now? (Sorry, I’m running out of questions that make sense.)

9. How many siblings do you have?

10. Where do you plan to travel next?

11. Why exactly there?

As we say it here in Salzburg, viel Spaß!

March 25, 2013

music for Holy Monday/Seder Evening – “He smote all the first-born of Egypt” from Georg Friedrich Händel’s Oratorio “Israel in Egypt” HWV 54

by ada

I seem to stick to Big Names this year, for today’s music is written by nobody else than Georg Friedrich Händel, who is considered to be the most important person if it comes to English Baroque music – even if he was actually a German. Well, that’s how things worked in the 18th century – the most important person in the history of French Baroque music; the man who called the famous French style that ruled the music scene of the 18th century, to life; the man who got the idea of synchronizing the bow movements of the violins in the orchestra first; the man who was smart enough to secure the publishing rights in whole France for himself alone, the man who is known as Jean-Baptiste Lully was, in fact, an Italian. So, if it comes to style, nationality plays never that big role we like to imagine.

Händel spent most of his musically active years in England. His music is as English, as it can be – biblical stories set in pompous orchestral style with heavy choir settings and lots of brass and drums. This oratorio, Israel in Egypt, tells the Passover story – and this aria (well, it’s actually no aria, it’s a choir movement) is about the last of the ten plagues. Enjoy the nice Quintfallsequenz starting at 1:35 :o)

March 25, 2013

Venice – San Giorgio Maggiore

by ada

san giorgio 1

san giorgio 2

san giorgio 7

san giorgio 9

san giorgio 14

March 24, 2013

music for Palm Sunday – Johann Sebastian Bach: Himmelskönig, sei willkommen (Cantata BWV 182)

by ada

During the Holy Week I will do a music post every day just like I did last year; let’s call it tradition. I will stay strictly Baroque, because that’s where I feel comfortable even if I didn’t touch my instruments since the outbreak of my depression, and that means already one and a half years without playing. I sometimes wonder if I ever will get back to my real life of libraries and awesome music. It seems so far away now.

For Palm Sunday let’s have the king of everything Baroque, Johann Sebastian Bach. He wrote this Cantata almost exactly 300 years ago and it is still more beautiful than most of the music others managed to create during those past 300 years.

March 24, 2013

Palm Sunday

by ada

St. Andrä church

St. Andrä church

St. Andrä church

plant in Mirabell

Mirabellgarten

mushrooms in Mirabellgarten

daffodils

great tit

strawberries

laundry

Burano butterfly

March 23, 2013

Hallein revisited

by ada

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hallein2

hallein13

hallein11

hallein14

hallein10

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hallein6

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hallein9

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hallein5

hallein4

hallein1

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March 22, 2013

Despereaux Jr.

by ada

Meet Despereaux Junior. We found him on the first floor nurses room terrace, suffering from severe hypothermia. We put him in a sterile urine container padded with gauze sheets and I took him home with me. He got a dinner of cucumbers, parrot seeds and some aged grana padano cheese I brought home from Venice. My coworker also donated some milk for him. When the temperature finally gets above zero I will reintroduce him to the big wild world. If we are stuck in the Ice Age forever as it seriously seems to be the case, he will grow up to be a domesticated mouse and will eat aged cheese on every day of his tiny life.

despereaux jr

March 20, 2013

Venice – Lido beach at dusk

by ada

Lido beach

Lido

Lido

Lido

Lido

Lido

March 17, 2013

Venice – day 1

by ada

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March 17, 2013

beautiful isle of somewhere

by ada

Guess in which city I am right now!

venice

March 16, 2013

Freilassing

by ada

freilassing7

freilassing1

freilassing5

freilassing2

freilassing3

freilassing6

March 16, 2013

music of the week – Republic: 67-es út

by ada

This post is dedicated to Bódi László, also known as Cipő, the leader of the Hungarian band Republic, who recently passed away. And while I’m definitely no fan of any popular Hungarian band, his music represents that chaotic, emotionally troubled era after the revolution I was growing up in. It was his music we sung in summer camps, sitting by the campfire and feeling sad and free and heroical at the same time, as teenagers usually do.

(And here is another song of his I posted a while ago.)

March 15, 2013

it’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas

by ada

I clearly wasn’t prepared for this snow. All I want to do now is to move to the Bahamas and start a brand new life. A life in which the words cold and snow don’t even bear any meaning.

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March 13, 2013

Dachau at dusk

by ada

I am very much like Keller, the hitman of some Lawrence Block stories: if I spend more than ten minutes in a town, I immediately start fantasising about living there. There are some strange places though where I just don’t get the feeling, and Dachau turned out being one of them. It is a nice, livable town with lots of green parks and abandoned gardens covered with snowdrops like it were delicate Persian rugs, but I simply just couldn’t picture myself living there, riding my bike on the streets and buying groceries at the Aldi shop. I’m not sure if it’s due to the proximity of the concentration camp – in fact, it is incorporated in the city, with kindergartens right next to the fence and living room windows looking at its alleys – because dealing with the past is necessary anyway and it’s rather a healthy way of doing that; but I found myself (totally unusually) not wanting to move there.

And a small but very typical detail: of all of my coworkers, the only one who approved my visit to the Dachau concentration camp, was  a practising Muslim and second generation Turkish immigrant. This fact tells tales of the Austrian mentality, which is rather like “oh no, I don’t go there, it’s not nice, I don’t want to see such things, they aren’t pretty”.  

Amper

dachau roofs

Dachau bus stop

Dachau church

Dachau Widerstandplatz

Dachau Pfarrplatz

Dachau church

Dachau Wieningerstrasse

Dachau antiquity

Dachau Hexengasse

Dachau Hofgarten

Dachau Hofgarten

Dachau Schloss

Dachau view

March 13, 2013

and death shall have no dominion

by ada

kz dachau

kz dachau

March 10, 2013

I have been young, and now am not too old

by ada

birthday flowers

bday

March 8, 2013

pussycat, pussycat, where have you been?

by ada

The Cat

March 8, 2013

the tale of two brothers

by ada

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March 7, 2013

Salzburg – Petersfriedhof, part 2

by ada

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March 7, 2013

Salzburg – Petersfriedhof, part 1

by ada

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