Archive for June, 2013

June 30, 2013

and the affairs of June

by ada

Another month of six books. I’m sort of proud of myself even if it’s actually pretty ridiculous*.

While observing this photo, you may think that I’m

a) unusually fond of Håkan Nesser, which I’m actually not. I found these books in the cellar of my previous workplace.

b) unusually fond of Andrea Camilleri, which I am, even if I hate his detective, Montalbano’s habit of eating snails and seafood all the time. I’m no seafood person, that’s the truth.

*I really wonder how did I manage over a hundred books yearly during my university times, besides working (a lot), researching my (unfinished) master thesis on a daily basis and practising three instruments (not as much as I should have, ehem, but playing instruments is pretty time-consuming anyway). I once was a clever person with an existing intellectual life. Now, only one and a half year later, the biggest intellectual challenge in my life is to remember the generic substitutes of drugs we don’t have at hand.**

**Oh, sorry. The biggest intellectual challenge in my life is to open the Austria Codex program on the computer and search it for generic substitutes, haha.

June readings

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June 28, 2013

Salzburg – Linzergassenfest

by ada

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June 26, 2013

bloglovin code

by ada

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Well, I’m still sort of perplexed now that Google gives up the Reader function which I loved (because I love everything that’s simple and do their job without fussing around). I was postponing the final decision since months; I tried Feedly (works fine but doesn’t really feel like home), The Old Reader (didn’t want to import my feeds properly, why?) and Bloglovin (imports feeds I already unsubscribed of months ago, wtf? Doubles feeds, even that of my own blog, wtf?); and I’m still hesitating. With this post I simply claim my blog for the comfort of my Bloglovin followers (all the three of them, haha).

Update: this post looked so miserable that I decided to decorate it with a totally out of context photo. Sneak peek of Mozartplatz right now (well, 15 minutes ago).

Salzburg Mozartplatz

June 25, 2013

music of the week – Joseph Wölfl: Adagio from Sonata in C minor Op. 25, Sonate précédée d’une introduction & fugue

by ada

Today’s composer is another short-lived wunderkind of Salzburg with the usual tendency to gambling, the piano virtuoso Joseph Wölfl, who spent his childhood in the same house where Michael Haydn was living at the time, became a pupil of both his and Leopold Mozart, befriended the son of the latter, Wolfgang Amadeus, whom he accompanied on his travels to Prague, and at the age of 25 he tried to fight the then 28 years old Beethoven in a piano duel  (unsuccessfully, though). During his short life of 39 years he performed and taught in addition to Vienna also in Warsaw, Paris and London.

His work, which consists mostly of sonatas, concertos and chamber music for the fortepiano, is typical for the early Romantic period, an era of instrumental virtuosi and geniuses, of chamber concerts and duels held in the living-rooms of rich bourgeois families, and of compositions usually including the words “grande” or “brillante” in their titles. This was also the era when the roots of musical canonisation (whose consequences I with real passion hate, but that’s a  theme for another post I most likely will never write) started to being formed; and this very process of creating the phenomenon we now call “classical music”*, has passed Joseph Wölfl gently by.

* it’s not the Classical period I mean here but the music that average people consider as “classical music”, also everything that is written by people owning musical education and is performed on orchestral instruments. So, the opposite of “popular music” which is written and performed by mostly non-musicians, haha.

June 25, 2013

Salzburg – Mozart-Wohnhaus (Tanzmeisterhaus)

by ada

Mozart Wohnhaus Entrance

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Mozart Portraits

Ausstellung

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Julius Meinl

June 22, 2013

we shall not cease from exploration

by ada

airplane

June 21, 2013

the philanthropist and the happy cat

by ada

cat

June 21, 2013

M&M

by ada

Móricka

Mihály

June 20, 2013

in time of roses(who amaze our now and here with paradise)

by ada

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June 18, 2013

Predigtstuhl (Preacher’s Pulpit)

by ada

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June 16, 2013

Bad Reichenhall – Königlicher Kurgarten

by ada

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June 16, 2013

Bad Reichenhall

by ada

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June 16, 2013

and there was all June in the garden

by ada

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June 14, 2013

like a bridge over troubled water

by ada

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June 14, 2013

excuse me while I kiss the sky

by ada

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June 13, 2013

collecting elderflowers

by ada

1. Pick a day. Any day. Preferably a day on which you’ve failed at your workplace in every possible ways, your patients were annoying, your coworkers were mean, and, at the end of your shift,  instead of going home and pretending that this day has never happened, you still had to make through an obligatory 60 minutes surgical lecture on how to wash your hands properly.

2. Go on an elderflower-collecting tour.

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3. Walk through poppy fields.

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4. Find wild strawberries…

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5. …and sour apples.

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6. Meet bugs…

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7. …and snails…

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8. …and nice people with whom you share the interest of photographing poppies. Seemingly it’s enough good a reason for them to be nice to you.

9. Find elderflowers.

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10. Get stung from stinging nettle that grows in bushes around elder trees.

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11. Get frustrated and have dark thoughts about the purpose of the universe and/or the misery of your own existence. 

12. Calm down and appreciate the wisdom of Mother Nature who is clever enough to save the blossoming elderflowers from the human race by letting them grow at least 5 meters high and surrounding elder trees with stinging nettle or simply placing them on the other side of deep waters.

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13. Try to pick elderflowers once again. Remember that using stinging nettle for rheumatoid arthritis and gout is a popular naturopathic treatment; and while you don’t suffer from any locomotory disease of inflammatory origin yet, the times, when you will be in the need of considering stinging nettle as your best friend, are  near. Age, with his stealing steps, you know.

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14. Do actually collect them elderflowers.

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15. Walk home through green meadows…

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16. … and poppy fields, once again.

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June 11, 2013

an afternoon in Linz

by ada

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June 6, 2013

bluebell blues

by ada

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June 6, 2013

never give all the heart

by ada

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June 5, 2013

in time of all sweet things

by ada

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June 5, 2013

poppy love

by ada

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June 2, 2013

chapter 679, in which Salzburg is entirely surrounded with water

by ada

It looks as if there were some reasons to start worrying about the rain.

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June 1, 2013

that lusty month of May

by ada

May was – in its depressing way – sort of successful: I managed to finish 6 (six!) books. I blame it entirely on the weather. Every time I woke up, bursting with energy (haha) and the will to go outside and do something exciting on my rare free days, all I had to do to completely lose all of my interest and enthusiasm was to take my earplugs out and hear the raindrops pattering against my windows (what raindrops, hail it was, stones of ice as big as diamonds, more than once).

And yes, I’m aware of the fact that I really can’t claim any improvement in the quality of my readings, but I say, baby steps. I still can’t bring up any interest in early Baroque music treatises or meaningful literature, but at least I seem to enjoy reading again and that’s enough for now. I may be myself again one day or I may not – it’s not an actual problem now. Surviving and learning to love life, these are my most important goals lately and I’m doing quite well with them, I dare say.

 May books

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