Archive for July, 2013

July 30, 2013

July, she will fly

by ada

Camilleri with Camilleri. My literary taste seems to have become very simple lately.  It also means: two books for July, and another three I didn’t finish reading yet (yes, I’m that confused type of person that reads more books at a time and leads different lives in parallel universes.) I’m still battling the truly abominable Captain Simonini, learning a lot about malfunctioning enterocytes and making Lizzie Borden to my role model. They all will be featured in the August post, given that I manage to finish their stories and don’t get distracted by more Camilleri.

July

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July 28, 2013

Salzburg – Hellbrunn park

by ada

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July 28, 2013

as I walk these broad majestic days

by ada

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July 25, 2013

music of the week – Johann Ernst Eberlin: Toccata and Fuga in D minor

by ada

Todays music is Toccata and Fuga in D minor, composed by Johann Ernst Eberlin, organist of the Salzburg Dom between 1726-1763. It could easily be mistaken for a particularly uninspired counterpoint study of Johann Sebastian Bach, because Eberlin was sort of old-fashioned, which is something I rather like in music (I will never forgive Richard Wagner what he did to tonality). I find this piece a bit boring though, as well as Eberlin, but in a way he is totally right: you can’t go wrong with good old quintfallsequenz; it never fails to do its job of touching the hearts.

July 24, 2013

summertime and the living is easy

by ada

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July 24, 2013

ah, said July where is the seed

by ada

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July 24, 2013

Chiemsee – Fraueninsel (the island of women)

by ada

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July 24, 2013

Chiemsee – Herreninsel (the island of men)

by ada

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July 23, 2013

Chiemsee

by ada

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July 22, 2013

of ships sailing the seas

by ada

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July 20, 2013

Salzburg – Michael Haydn Museum

by ada

Michael Haydn

eyeglasses of Michael Haydn

Michael Haydn Museum Salzburg

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Entrance of the Michael Haydn Museum Salzburg

July 20, 2013

Salzburger! Festspiele! 2013!

by ada

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July 19, 2013

Salzburg – Botanischer Garten

by ada

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July 19, 2013

answer July where is the bee

by ada

bee

another bee

July 12, 2013

the place where Germany meets Austria

by ada

Well, the Hammerauer Brücke isn’t really a place you must see before you die, but I stumbled upon it quite accidentally today, so here it is. Poor Rozi died almost a month ago and I was totally handicapped without a bike, so I hopped over to Germany to buy a new one, because that’s what you do if you live in Salzburg and need something: you hop over to Germany to shop, because Salzburg is the most expensive city in whole Austria. Just in case you were planning to move here, haha.

So I bought my new bike (Rozi, I will always remember you!) and drove it back home to Salzburg. A lazy 14 km tour beside the Saalach in the descending sun with only a minimal time spent with getting lost.

Stadler Rad

The Hammerauer Brücke:

Bridge Hammerau

On the German side you get an overwhelming amount of elementary school art:

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Hammerau wall

Hammerau art wall

Over the bridge and the Saalach:

Hammerauer Bridge

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Welcome in the nuclear-free zone:

Siezenheim

Austria

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July 11, 2013

Mini Salzburg 2013

by ada

Mini Salzburg is an educational summer day camp, held every two years, where children have their own “state”, they chose their government democratically and learn, how society works. It looks pretty fun and the kids definitely seem to enjoy it.

You might not know about it (which is fine; who knows anything about Hungary anyway, haha), but this kind of children’s republic actually existed in reality, in Hungary, after WW2. It was called Gaudiopolis (Joy City) and gave home for almost 800 orphans between the years 1945 and 1950. It was founded by a Lutheran pastor, Sztehlo Gábor, maintained autonomy and was financially, politically and culturally completely independent from the Hungarian government. The children received education by Sztehlo and his volunteers, and also worked to support themselves. Gaudiopolis had  its own constitution and laws, a prime minister chosen democratically by the children themselves, a democratic parliament and an own monetary system with own currency (Gapo-Dollar). They also practised complete freedom of religion. Except for some occasionally donations from the International Red Cross, they received help neither from the Hungarian government, nor private persons. In 1950, the Hungarian Communist Party took the buildings away and the children were transported into state orphanages. Democracy (both for children and adults) was over for the next forty years.

The 1947 movie Valahol Európában (Somewhere in Europe), is loosely based on the real story of Gaudiopolis and is considered to be one of the best Hungarian movies ever. You can read its (very short) English summary here or watch the whole movie here (in Hungarian, though). Some information on Sztehlo Gábor is here. I couldn’t find anything about Gaudiopolis in English, which really is a shame, because it was quite a unique phenomenon in the European (and, I guess, also in the international) politics.

And some photos of Mini Salzburg.

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July 11, 2013

of April, May, of June, and July flowers

by ada

April

May

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July

July 10, 2013

conversations with my coworkers – part 7

by ada

(Because sometimes the one without brains is me).

We are sitting in the nurses’ room, suffering from the usual workday afternoon energy level crash after 8 hours of constant stress and running-around and still 5 hours to go.

coworker: Wow. We have ecological dishwasher.

me: What is a co-logical dishwasher?

coworker: Ecological.

me: Oncological?! Extra for the needs of cancer patients?

coworker: ECOLOGICAL!

me: Oh. Do we have some more coffee?

July 7, 2013

summer begins to have the look

by ada

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July 7, 2013

conversations with my coworkers – part 6

by ada

(Sunday morning at my previous workplace. We are having breakfast and doing small talk.)

coworker: I never work on Sundays.

me (perplexed): Well, it’s Sunday and you are here, working.

coworker: It doesn’t count. It’s for money. But I never do laundry or vacuuming on Sundays. It’s not allowed. If you work on Sundays, God will punish you. I knew a man, he worked on a Sunday and his pigs got sick, all of them. Then he worked again and his son had a car accident and died. God punished him.

me: Whom did He punish? The son or the father?

coworker: Both of them.

me: It doesn’t make much sense to me. Which religion do you actually have?

coworker: I’m Christian.

me: Oh. I thought Jesus has already dealt with these kind of problems, like working on Shabbat or punishing sons for the sins of their fathers…

coworker: I don’t know what you are talking about.

me: The Bible. The differences of religious attitude in the Old and the New Testament.

coworker: I haven’t read the Bible. I don’t like reading.

me: Well, you know, there is this story about the Pharisees trying to trick Jesus out and asking him about his healing actions on a Shabbat…

coworker: I don’t know what you are talking about. If you work on Sundays, God will punish you.

me: Like, kill your son?

coworker: That’s the laws.

me: Well, those laws you are referring to, were originally meant as a survival guide to a small desert nation in a hostile environment, formulated more than 3300 years ago, on the level of ethical and moral development of a society of those times. There is this hypothesis of comparing the evolution of the human society to the ontogenesis of personality…

coworker: I don’t know what you are talking about. Which nation?

me: The Jews, of course. I’m talking about the practical role of the Ten Commandments in the survival of Judaism under disadvantageous conditions. And about the difference between Judaism and Christianity.

coworker: I don’t understand why are you speaking about Jews. These are the laws of God. God made them, not the Jews. God has nothing to do with Jews.

me: You mean, except calling them His own, chosen people? Actually, the problematic of whether the one and only God made the Jewish people or the Jewish people made up the idea of the one and only God is certainly very interesting…

coworker: I don’t know what you are talking about.

me: You know what? This discussion doesn’t make any sense. People should not be allowed to discuss religion on an empty stomach. Let’s have our breakfasts and talk about the weather.

July 2, 2013

Glasenbachklamm – part 3

by ada

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July 2, 2013

Glasenbachklamm – part 2

by ada

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July 2, 2013

Glasenbachklamm – part 1

by ada

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July 1, 2013

things that make me happy

by ada

1. This tote bag I bought at the Mozart museum. While it promotes the idea of the consumer society which I don’t exactly cultivate, it is so like Mozart, with his love of red robes and all, really.

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2. Reading this book. It’s really promising.  I’m on page 21 yet, and the protagonist of the novel has already made his point about his deep hate of 1) Jews 2) German people 3) French people 4) Italian people 5) clergy in general 6) Jesuits in particular 7) women, totally clear. I’m thrilled to find out whom else he plans to hate on the following 489 pages.

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3. Living in this house.

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4. The absence of fire alarm in my kitchen. Having an extraordinarily sensitive fire alarm in my previous apartment made my life really difficult there. After my epic first meeting with the firemen and the police, who made their visit at my flat while I was peacefully baking some flourless cookies and dancing to Disko Partizani in my pajamas (the perfect example of the half-witted pyromaniac immigrant with a  shitty taste of music, whose existence alone manages to ruin the morals of Holy Motherland of Austria), I ended up eating almost exclusively raw food most of the time.

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5. Kitchen windowsill herbs. I’m not a plant person (my mother has somehow forgotten to pass her gardening genes on to me), so I hope they will survive.

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6. Homemade elderflower cordial with (windowsill) lemongrass, my first experiment with food preserving. It tastes pretty much like plain water. My carreer chances as a celebrity cook aren’t that high, I guess.

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7. More elderflower for a new (hopefully better) try.

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