Schulmuseum Friedrichshafen – die Sonderausgabe

by ada

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Dritte Reich Schulmuseum Friedrichshafen 11

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auch du gehörst dem Führer 3

das grosse buch fuer jungen 1

die fahnen wehen

Dritte Reich Schulmuseum Friedrichshafen 1

Dritte Reich Schulmuseum Friedrichshafen 2

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das deutsche volk

utz kaempft fuer hitler 1

Dritte Reich Schulmuseum Friedrichshafen 20

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Dritte Reich Schulmuseum Friedrichshafen 15

rassenfibel 1

Dritte Reich Schulmuseum Friedrichshafen 13

hilf mit 3

Dritte Reich Schulmuseum Friedrichshafen 18

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10 Comments to “Schulmuseum Friedrichshafen – die Sonderausgabe”

  1. Sonderausgabe indeed, quite in the sign of the times! It makes me think of my blonde Hitlerjugend grandma in Maribor falling for my dark, blackmarketeering, Serbian barber grandpa. Messing with your plans ever since :D

    • I love these old family stories :o) My grandparents met right after ww2 in a camp for people who didn`t have any place to go after the war, just right before the Russians took away my grandfather for some years of “malenkij robot.”
      This part of the museum was actually very disturbing and in a creepy way it reminded me of my own Socialist childhood – all the books about the great Soviet army and the adventures of fellow pioneers, our uniforms, the flags, the marches, the ideological background behind your every move… I actually had a great childhood :o/
      It´s terrible how you can make anything out of a child just with some propaganda.

      • Very true. We were pioneers too, red kerchiefs, blue caps with red star, and celebrated Tito’s birthday every year almost like… Christmas. :) Alas, Russians and Americans were pretty evenly away from us. Italians had coffee though, and chewing gum, and borders were free. Unless you exaggerated with quantity. :) We could have interesting conversations about our childhoods. And life in general.

        • Maybe we’ll meet some day :o) Our childhoods must have been pretty similar, except that Hungarian borders weren’t free. My great grandmother actually supported her family (my mother and her sisters, because their father was either in a Siberian work camp or jobless because on a political black list) through smuggling from Slovakia. I was almost 13 when I saw and tried Nutella for the first time :DDD
          Okay, and now I stop speaking like a rickety, hundred-year-old lady about her golden era right before ww1 :DDD

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