Posts tagged ‘Arts’

July 27, 2015

Wien – MAK, part 3

by ada

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 93

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 158

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 92

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 166

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 60

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 74

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 18

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 37

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 34

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 33

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 17

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 129

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 1774

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 193

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 88

July 26, 2015

Wien – MAK, part 1

by ada

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst / Gegenwartskunst (Austrian Museum of Applied Arts / Contemporary Art)

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 69

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 44

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 130

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 14

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 27

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 48

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 85

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 21

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 50

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 5

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 7

Untitled 23

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 9

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 13

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 23

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 124

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 134

Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst in Wien 164

June 30, 2015

Wien – MAK Design Labor

by ada

MDL 1

MDL 16

MDL 12

MDL 23

MDL 38

MDL 34

MDL 30

MDL 14

MDL 17

MDL 4

MDL 40

MDL 31

MDL 29

MDL 15

MDL 9

MDL 28

June 28, 2015

Wien – MAK preview

by ada

Industria

Ars

March 8, 2015

Wien – Neidhart Fresken

by ada

Neidhart 5

Neidhart 98

Neidhart 61

Neidhart 89

Neidhart 51

Neidhart 110

Neidhart 123

Untitled 252

Neidhart 37

Neidhart 115

Neidhart 44

November 16, 2014

Budapest – Iparművészeti Múzeum (Museum of Applied Arts) – the exhibitions

by ada

wall carpet 3

wall carpet 6

Untitled 50a

secession exhibition 3

tiffany lamp 1

Untitled 53a

Untitled 56x

pieta

chinese sculpture

Untitled 46

tea warmer doll

dining 1

dishes 1

tile

yurta

Untitled 69s

Untitled 45

sculpture 1

old plate 1

Ipar 2

November 15, 2014

Budapest – Iparművészeti Múzeum (Museum of Applied Arts) – the architecture

by ada

floor 5

ceiling 7

wall 2

Untitled 61

Untitled 34

Untitled 49

Untitled 8y

Untitled 117

April 16, 2014

music for Holy Wednesday – Jan Dismas Zelenka: Lamentatio I pro Hebdomana sancta, ZWV 53

by ada

According to my own tradition I’m supposed to post something French today. Two years ago I wrote about the most beautiful Tenebrae music of all times, Troisième Leçon de Ténèbres pour deux voix composed by the 18th century royal harpsichord teacher François Couperin. Last year it was Leçon de Mercredi by another royal harpsichord teacher, Michel Delalande. I can’t make up my heart to leave my eternal love and longterm imaginary boyfriend, Jan Dismas Zelenka completely out of this year’s series though, so for Holy Wednesday let’s listen to one of his beautiful lamentations, Lamentatio I pro Habdomana sancta, based upon Prophet Jeremiah’s laments. While it’s definitely not French music, it fits the Tenebrae-tradition perfectly. 

April 16, 2014

music for Holy Tuesday – Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel: Brockes-Passion

by ada

I again feel overwhelmed by the amount of beautiful music composed for this special time of the year – I wish I could listen to the Bach-Passions all the time and call it done without missing out on everything that led to them: the smaller composers and their small steps on the way to Bach’s perfection. Fortunately I have a thing for small composers and their imperfect music that makes me happy without making me hate myself (which is the case if I listen to too much Bach at a time, haha). So for Holy Tuesday let’s have a so-called “small composer”, Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel, Bach’s contemporary who, before ending up as a Kapellmeister at the court of Gotha, travelled through Europe serving in cities like Rome, Prague and Wrocław, made friends with names like Vivaldi, Fasch and Bononcini and gained a reputation in the eyes of his peers as high as Johann Sebastian Bach himself. He even made it into Johann Mattheson‘s Grundlage einer Ehren-Pforte*, a collection of contemporary musicians’ biographies. One of his compositions (Bist du bei mir) is included in the collection of small exercise pieces Bach edited together for his son, Wilhelm Friedemann Bach and that was later passed on to his second wife, Anna Magdalena Bach. Unfortunately only a small amount of Stölzel’s work survived his successor Jiří Antonín Benda‘s  ruthless selection process, who considered the majority of them simply as “useless junk”. 

After Barthold Heinrich Brockes published his libretto Der für die Sünde der Welt gemarterte und sterbende Jesus in 1712, it became quickly a thing of fashion to set it to music. People like Händel, Telemann, Fasch and even Bach (in his Johannespassion) all made their versions of it and so did Stölzel in 1725. His Brockes-Passion has a stunning first and an airy, sweet last movement and some (quite uninteresting but very German Baroque) filling in between. Since it is one of all the twelve of his surviving works, it is really worth listening to.

* Well, he actually submitted himself, because he had a sense of business. But hey, that’s how the world of music works, even today. All you need is the ability to promote yourself in a shameless way and make as much superficial friendships as possible for future use. Being talented and/or a good musician is only an added plus, not the least mandatory.  

PS: in 2012 I posted something Early Italian: the Stabat Mater of Giovanni Felice Sances. In 2013 it was another version of the Brockes-Passion, that of Georg Philipp Telemann

February 9, 2014

Budapest – Shoes on the Danube Promenade

by ada

Untitled 50

Untitled 35

Untitled 72

Untitled 71

Untitled 58

Untitled 51

Untitled 81

Untitled 60

Untitled 61

Untitled 47

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Untitled 34

October 23, 2013

Salzburg – the Trick Fountains of Schloss Hellbrunn

by ada

Wasserspiele 2

Wasserspiele 14

Wasserspiele 18

Wasserspiele 4

Wasserspiele 5

Wasserspiele 6

Orfeo

Wasserspiele 1

Hellbrunn

Wasserspiele 30

Wasserspiele 31

Wasserspiele 9

Wasserspiele 11

Wasserspiele 10

Wasserspiele 21

Wasserspiele 25

October 23, 2013

Salzburg – Schloss Hellbrunn

by ada

Hellbrunn solar clock

Hellbrunn 12

Hellbrunn unicorn

Hellbrunn 9

Hellbrunn painted walls

Hellbrunn 7

Hellbrunn 1

Hellbrunn 6

Hellbrunn 5

Hellbrunn wall unicorn

Hellbrunn toy soldiers

Hellbrunn window

Hellbrunn 2

October 11, 2013

Budapest

by ada

Capa

September 20, 2013

home is where the music is

by ada

1

Untitled 2

Untitled 74

Untitled 66

Untitled 70

Untitled 87

Untitled 71

Untitled 95

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Untitled 145

September 7, 2013

Budapest – ARC 2013

by ada

ARC 24

ARC 3

ARC 6

ARC 9

ARC 14

ARC 4

ARC 18

ARC 16

ARC 7

ARC 25

ARC 13

ARC 5

ARC 23

August 9, 2013

music of the week – Passacaglia from Georg Muffats collection Apparatus Musico-Organisticus

by ada

Georg Muffat was a fellow musician of Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber at the Salzburg court of the Archbishops Max Gandolph Graf von Kuenburg and Johann Ernst Thun, between 1678-1690. He was lucky enough to study both the French and the Italian way of making music (oh those honest and uncomplicated times of the 17th century with only two main trends to compare and to believe in) and to meet the two leading and trend-creating personalities of the era: Jean-Baptiste Lully (yay to the French) and Arcangelo Corelli (hurrah for the Italian). In the preface of his collections Florilegium primum and Florilegium secundum, he gives very detailed instructions* on how to play “in the French manner”, like how to hold the bow, how to place the fingers, etc. He also claimed (himself) to be the very first musician to introduce the French style to the German-speaking part of Europe, which I’m not sure is a historically true statement, but he believed so. Whatever, he did a tremendous job in creating the very beginnings of the so-called “mixed style” which later evolved to the fully completed style of German Baroque.

* that’s what makes me so mad at all those ignorant musicians who claim that we can play Baroque music as we please, because we have no information about the performance practice of the pre-recording times. Because we do have. A lot. More than enough for a lifetime to study. Every time I hear modern pianists and symphonic orchestras play Baroque, I cringe from pain. It should not be that way. Musicians should be educated about music before letting them play that music. I’m a firm believer of thorough education.

July 25, 2013

music of the week – Johann Ernst Eberlin: Toccata and Fuga in D minor

by ada

Todays music is Toccata and Fuga in D minor, composed by Johann Ernst Eberlin, organist of the Salzburg Dom between 1726-1763. It could easily be mistaken for a particularly uninspired counterpoint study of Johann Sebastian Bach, because Eberlin was sort of old-fashioned, which is something I rather like in music (I will never forgive Richard Wagner what he did to tonality). I find this piece a bit boring though, as well as Eberlin, but in a way he is totally right: you can’t go wrong with good old quintfallsequenz; it never fails to do its job of touching the hearts.

July 20, 2013

Salzburg – Michael Haydn Museum

by ada

Michael Haydn

eyeglasses of Michael Haydn

Michael Haydn Museum Salzburg

Scores in Michael Haydn Museum

Entrance of the Michael Haydn Museum Salzburg

July 20, 2013

Salzburger! Festspiele! 2013!

by ada

Untitled 25

Untitled 1

Untitled 22

Untitled 16

Untitled 13

June 25, 2013

Salzburg – Mozart-Wohnhaus (Tanzmeisterhaus)

by ada

Mozart Wohnhaus Entrance

Mozart1

Mozart Portraits

Ausstellung

Mozart2

Julius Meinl

March 25, 2013

music for Holy Monday/Seder Evening – “He smote all the first-born of Egypt” from Georg Friedrich Händel’s Oratorio “Israel in Egypt” HWV 54

by ada

I seem to stick to Big Names this year, for today’s music is written by nobody else than Georg Friedrich Händel, who is considered to be the most important person if it comes to English Baroque music – even if he was actually a German. Well, that’s how things worked in the 18th century – the most important person in the history of French Baroque music; the man who called the famous French style that ruled the music scene of the 18th century, to life; the man who got the idea of synchronizing the bow movements of the violins in the orchestra first; the man who was smart enough to secure the publishing rights in whole France for himself alone, the man who is known as Jean-Baptiste Lully was, in fact, an Italian. So, if it comes to style, nationality plays never that big role we like to imagine.

Händel spent most of his musically active years in England. His music is as English, as it can be – biblical stories set in pompous orchestral style with heavy choir settings and lots of brass and drums. This oratorio, Israel in Egypt, tells the Passover story – and this aria (well, it’s actually no aria, it’s a choir movement) is about the last of the ten plagues. Enjoy the nice Quintfallsequenz starting at 1:35 :o)

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