Posts tagged ‘border’

April 29, 2017

the place where Germany meets Switzerland

by ada

The German city of Konstanz is in close proximity to the Swiss town of Kreuzlingen. There are several border points, the most picturesque is the one in the district Klein Venedig (Little Venice).

Start out at the nature museum Sea Life.

Walk along Lake Constance…

…until you arrive at the border point…

…marked by the German artist Johannes Dörflingers “Kunstgrenze“, a constellation of 22 sculptures, which commemorates the 2006 demolition of the barbed wire fence, set up in 1938 by the Nazi Germany.

Hi Magician!

Just one step and you’ve already left the territory of the European Union.

The seagulls could not care less.

Look back at Konstanz…

…and forward to Kreuzlingen.

Some unidentified Swiss buildings.

Turn back to the Herrscherin and the Herrscher (Mr and Mrs Ruler, haha). They are there to lead you…

…to the Wheel of Fortune. There the path splits into two. The way on the left leads to Switzerland, the way on the right back to Germany.

There is a football field on the Swiss side to make international affairs happen…

…and a beer tent on the German side to strengthen the friendship between the two nations. As you see, the Germans are rather serious about their beer culture.

February 21, 2017

the place where Germany meets Switzerland

by ada

One place where Germany meets Switzerland is somewhere in the middle of Lake Constance. To visit it, board the ferry in Friedrichshafen.

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Don’t worry, you’ll arrive relaxed to your destination (entspannt am Ziel!).

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When boarding, be aware of international spies.

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Take your seat and enjoy the sight of your fellow travellers’ hair situation.

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Watch the last passengers hurry up on board…

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…and a few minutes later say goodbye to Germany.

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On your way, greet those who are sailing…

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and the rich people who can afford to pay 200 euros for a 30 minutes joyride flight those who prefer air to water.

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And now, on to Swiss waters!

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The border is somewhere here…

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…or here?

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Whatever. Can you spot the pirates?

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A close-up of the fearless devils of the Bodensee:

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Now it’s time to take a last look back…

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…because you are almost at your destination!

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Finish your drinks (or taking photographs of other people’s finished drinks, haha)…

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…and prepare for landing.

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To enjoy your adventure to the fullest, be the last one to leave the ferry.

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Welcome in Switzerland!

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June 12, 2016

the place where Liechtenstein meets Switzerland

by ada

Of all places of the world, Liechtenstein is the one I never gave any thought before my surprisingly adventurous last summer. People like me* usually have nothing to do with the tax paradise of Europe, and there is a reason for it, haha.**

* people coming from Eastern-European countries and living on nurses’ salaries

** there was that awkward moment, when I got confronted with the price of one single scoop of Liechtensteinian ice cream; it’s the equivalent of 4 euros in CHF. It made me immediately realise that despite having come a long way since my Socialist childhood, I’m still very, very far from blending in

Anyway. If you all of a sudden, under whatever circumstances, find yourself in Vaduz, as it happened to me simply by becoming a travel nurse, you really should take the time to visit the last remaining wooden bridge over the  river Alpenrhein.

You may take the bus there, because public traffic in Liechtenstein is excellent…

Liechtenstein Bus 2

…except when it’s not. Because it’s early in the morning. Or late in the afternoon. Or it is Saturday. Or Sunday. Or any other holiday.

Alte Rheinbruecke Vaduz Sevelen 11

Fortunately, everything is in walking distance in Vaduz, so if you are too impatient to wait a whole hour for the next bus, just take the road and walk along some poetic scenario…

Vaduz Castle 1

…and a colourful industrial area…

Vaduz 1

…until you reach the Alpenrhein…

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…and your destination, the Alte Rheinbrücke.

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It is 135 meter long…

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…and is made completely of wood.

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The original bridge was built in 1871. During the following 140 years it needed to be adjusted to the actual water capacity of the river several times.

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The last renovation took place in 2010. There is a small memorial plaque hanging inside of the bridge to one of construction workers, the carpenter Andreas Maier-Toth, who recently passed away. Similar to the half of this planet’s population, he too had Hungarian roots.

Andreas Maier-Toth 1

Now walk over the bridge together with other creepy shadows fellow tourists.

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Once safely arrived in Switzerland…

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…consider your possibilities.

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You can either look over to Vaduz castle (remember, it’s full of living princes waiting for you to marry all of them)…

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…or admire the Swiss flora…

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…and fauna.

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Or you can just take a lazy bike ride along the river.

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This is also the place where, after a long, exhausting but fruitful career as a Swiss investment banker, you can finally retire and live for your hobbies.

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March 6, 2016

the place where Austria meets Switzerland

by ada

I can’t seem to be able to catch up with this blog anymore – eight months have passed since I visited Hohenems. It’s about time to either give up on this blog or start posting again. Let’s try the latter, okay?

Hohenems, the birth place of Salomon Sulzer (more on that soon), also happens to be a border town to Switzerland, which is double win :o) Only fifteen minutes walk from the town center gets you to this practical but not very charming commercial area:

Hohenems Swiss border

Here you can either pass the abandoned border control buildings and continue along the traffic over the bridge to Diepoldsau…

Hohenems Swiss border 1

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or you can walk down along the Old Rhine…

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…and do something…

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…much better:

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…you can swim over to Switzerland!

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Or, if you (like me) haven’t yet figured out the Nr.1 rule of the Vorarlberger Summer, which is always wear your swimsuit under your regular clothes, you can just hang your feet in shallow waters…

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…and collect freshwater mussel shells…

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…of which there are plenty.

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June 30, 2014

the place where Hungary meets Slovakia

by ada

The river Danube forms a 143 km long natural border between Hungary and Slovakia. There are three bridges where pedestrians can cross over the Danube and pass the border: the Erzsébet bridge between Komárom (HU) and Komárno (SK), a (noname) bridge between Vámosszabadi (HU) and Medve (SK) and the Mária Valéria bridge between Esztergom (HU) and Párkány/Štúrovo (SK).

The Mária Valéria bridge was built in 1894-95, and was blown up two times: in 1919 by the Czechoslovakian army and in 1944 by the fleeing German troops. It wasn’t reconstructed again until 2001.

I started out in beautiful Esztergom, which is one of the oldest Hungarian cities. Its history goes back to Celtic times, and it’s also the birthplace of the first Hungarian king, István.

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I walked over the bridge…

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… while admiring the architecture…

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…and some picturesque shadow patterns.

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The basilica of Esztergom is beautiful…

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…and so is the Danube.

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I arrived in Štúrovo (or as it was originally called for some hundred years before Socialist times, Párkány).

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Slovakian people are ready to give you some ancient life advice.

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I passed the harbour (shall we call this tiny dock harbour?) and looked back at Mária Valéria bridge…

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…and over the Danube. Hi Hungary!

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I spent a (sunny and hot) afternoon at Vadaš termal bath where I ate lángos and drank kofola

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… and walked over the bridge again. Goodbye Slovakia, until next time.

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April 24, 2014

the place where Hungary meets Slovakia

by ada

One of the places where you can “officially” leave Hungary, is the Erzsébet-bridge between Komárom in Hungary and Komárno in Slovakia. It was built in 1892 an is named after Romy Schneider Empress Elisabeth of Austria, because we Hungarians have always loved our Sisi, even during her lifetime, which is a rare phenomenon and is not very characteristic for the Hungarian collective spirit. Usually we first appreciate people after their death (if at all, haha). While it’ s definitely not the most charming spot on Earth or even in Hungary, it’s still a border, and I love borders. So here is a guide on how to cross them.

1. Walk up to the bridge.

Komárno Erzsébet-híd 1

2. Keep walking.

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3. Look back at Hungary (yes, I did shop at that Tesco. I was that hungry).

Komárom Tesco

4. Admire the Danube (not a particularly breathtaking sight for somebody who is such a mountain person like me but, in my opinion, the second best thing after mountains is water, so I’m okay with this less than exciting view).

Komárom Danube

4. Walk until the middle of the bridge.

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5. Look down.

Danube

6. Look up. Welcome in Slovakia!

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October 16, 2013

the place where Germany meets Austria

by ada

One of the most magnificent part of the Austrian-German border is the Untersberg, the pride and proud of the people of Salzburg. Its history is overcrowded with mythical creatures like emperors with ever-growing beards, dwarfs, witches and pretty mountain women who wear only white and like to pick handsome young humans to father them some children.

fog below Untersberg

Untersberg cable car house

Just take the cable car and simply vanish in Nothing.

Untersberg cable car

Untersberg fog 2

Untersberg fog 1

Once safely arrived at the top, try to find your way in the fog without falling down from rocks into invisible depths.

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Admire the alpine flora and some leftover objects of the human civilisation.

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dry grass in fog

pines at Untersberg

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Reach the Geiereck (Vulture’s Corner).

Untersberg path in fog

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Look over Austria…

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…and then Germany.

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Oh well. Maybe you’d better visit this place on a nice and sunny summer day instead of at the beginning of Fog Season, which with its ten months per year is the longest season in Salzburg.

Wait for the sun to come out.

sun over Untesberg

Go over to another peak, the Salzburger Hochtron. Meet (the signs of) fellow travellers, pass memorials for the fallen members of the WW2 Mountain Troops and people who failed at hiking the same trail you’re walking right now.

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two travellers Untersberg

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Memorial Bergtruppen Untersberg

Do you see the tiny cross at the top? That’s your destination.

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sign Untersberg

Salzburger Hochtron 2

stairs to Salzburger Hochtron

Now you are at the top pf the world, high above the clouds, where the sky is always blue and the sun always shines.

Untersberg view

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July 12, 2013

the place where Germany meets Austria

by ada

Well, the Hammerauer Brücke isn’t really a place you must see before you die, but I stumbled upon it quite accidentally today, so here it is. Poor Rozi died almost a month ago and I was totally handicapped without a bike, so I hopped over to Germany to buy a new one, because that’s what you do if you live in Salzburg and need something: you hop over to Germany to shop, because Salzburg is the most expensive city in whole Austria. Just in case you were planning to move here, haha.

So I bought my new bike (Rozi, I will always remember you!) and drove it back home to Salzburg. A lazy 14 km tour beside the Saalach in the descending sun with only a minimal time spent with getting lost.

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The Hammerauer Brücke:

Bridge Hammerau

On the German side you get an overwhelming amount of elementary school art:

Hammerau

Hammerau wall

Hammerau art wall

Over the bridge and the Saalach:

Hammerauer Bridge

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Welcome in the nuclear-free zone:

Siezenheim

Austria

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February 12, 2013

the place where Germany meets Austria

by ada

Do you remember the place where Germany meets Austria? Well, that’s not the only one. Germany and Austria share a border of 784 kilometers, with some beautiful spots, and I plan to explore as many of them as I can in my remaining few months in Salzburg.

The place where the river Salzach takes a turn and forms the peninsula the small German town of Laufen is located on is called Salzachschleife. The word “laufen” actually means “to run” in German, which is a funny name for a city, especially for such a sleepy little one, like this. There are two bridges linking the towns Oberndorf (Austria) and Laufen (Germany): the Salzachbrücke and the Europasteg.

This is the Salzachbrücke:

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The German side:

Laufen from bridge

And the Austrian:

Oberndorf from bridge

And that’s the Salzach in both directions:

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While in Austria spring has already arrived…

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…in Germany somebody was greeting me personally with this huge capital A in the snow:

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Maybe these German ducks?

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The other bridge, Europasteg with the Kalvarienberg-Kapelle in Oberndorf as seen from Germany:

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And the view of Laufen from the Totenberg in Austria:

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And finally, the Salzachschleife itself (inside of the circle is Germany, outside is Austria):

Salzachschleife

Schleife

June 22, 2012

the place where Germany meets Austria

by ada

That’s the place called Überfuhr, where the river Saalach joins the river Salzach. They create together a natural border. One side of the river belongs to Germany, the other to Austria.

That’s the Austrian side:

And that’s Germany:

And that’s me, breaking deep into German territory:

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