Posts tagged ‘cantata’

December 31, 2014

music for the last day of 2014 – Johann Sebastian Bach: Gottlob! nun geht das Jahr zu Ende, BWV 28

by ada

All I can say about 2014 is exactly what Erdmann Neumeister, the librettist of this cantata has already put into words in an oh-so-appropriate manner: thank God it’s over.

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December 26, 2014

music for the 2. Day of Christmas – Dietrich Buxtehude: Das neugeborne Kindelein, BuxWV 13

by ada

I originally intended to post this cantata for Christmas Day, but, alas, my scheduling skills aren’t the ones I can be proud of. You would think there’s no way to confuse 25 with 26, but you’re wrong. I’m really talented if it comes to creating chaos. Anyway. This is one of my favourite Christmas music ever (let’s forget the fact that this piece was written for New Year’s Eve, shall we?) and I am not willing to leave it out of this series just because I still can’t do proper maths after going to school for 25 years. Ha, ha.

Dietrich (orig. Diderik Hansen) Buxtehude, although of Danish origin, is one of the greatest names in the history of the Early(ish) German Baroque music. During his lifetime he was well acknowledged and of a considerable reputation, and served as a role model for many younger composers like Händel, Mattheson and even Johann Sebastian Bach who, at the age of twenty, walked more than 300 kms from Arnstadt to Lübeck to study with him. He (Bach) rejected Buxtehude’s offer to marry his oldest daughter, Anna Margareta, though. He wasn’t entirely opposed to the idea of marrying into the Buxtehude family, but his choice of wife would have been Dorothea Catrin, the youngest of Buxtehude’s six daughters. Unfortunately, Buxtehude was a man who liked things organised neatly everything to go the way of proper 17th century social customs, like successors marry the daughters of their predecessors and oldest daughters marry first. Poor Anna Margareta who, being somewhat over-proportioned and, at thirty, well over the desirable age, has a few years earlier already been rejected by both Johann Matheson and Georg Friedrich Händel. She obviously wasn’t that sweet little thing twenty-year-old composers dream of when applying for new jobs that come with a wife. Don’t worry, she did not end up as a spinster though: in 1707, at the age of 38, she wedded Johann Christian Schieferdecker, a composer of no real importance but a man of enough courage to take the risk of marrying a woman wanted by nobody. Brave guy.

And now let’s hope this post will go up on the 2. Day of Christmas instead of on Good Friday 2015.

April 19, 2014

music for Holy Saturday – “Schlaf wohl, ihr seligen Gebeine” from Georg Philipp Telemann’s funeral cantata “Du aber Daniel, gehe hin” (TWV 4:17)

by ada

Georg Philipp Telemann, who is one of my favourite composers, was a fascinating character, a Renaissance man of the Baroque era, a self-made musician who mastered about every instrument he composed for and who, at the age of 80, was still mentally active enough to create a tuning system based on logarithmic principles. He was also friends with Johann Sebastian Bach, godfather to his second son, Carl Philipp Emanuel and pen pals with Georg Friedrich Händel.

He composed his funeral cantata, betitled Du aber Daniel, gehe hin as his first wife died in childbirth after only 15 months of marriage. The lyrics of its closing choir movement Schlaf wohl, ihr seligen Gebeine (Sleep well, you sacred bones) is based loosely on the text of the Brockes-Passion (which I feel the need to mention every day lately, but well, it’s quite difficult not to be aware of its significance if speaking of Baroque Passion music).

PS.: The last two years’ posts were a Miserere of Zelenka (of course! Zelenka!) and two Jewish liturgical pieces written for the Amsterdam Synagogue by Cristiano Giuseppe Lidarti. I’m planning to do a series on Baroque synagogal music soon in case I ever manage to finish the Salzburg Series during my lifetime, which at this point seems rather unlikely, haha.

April 14, 2014

music for Palm Sunday – 1. Choral from Johann Sebastian Bach’s cantata “Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern” (BWV 1)

by ada

The time has come again for the Holy Week Series, for the third year in a row. I’m sure you all are as happy as I am to witness my musicology writer career blossoming, haha. I am kind of late with Palm Sunday music though since we’re already deep into Holy Monday, but life has been pretty busy lately and left me no time for this blog.

I had a weird Palm Sunday, so I decided to post a similarly weird music, because I am vindictive.

The only cantata Johann Sebastian Bach ever composed for Palm Sunday is the cantata Himmelskönig, sei willkommen (BWV 182) which I have already posted last year. At the times Bach served in Leipzig, the practice of tempus clausum (closed time), which means that during the weeks of Lent and Advent no festivities and also no music at the liturgy other than Passion plays are allowed, was kept quite strictly. The only exception was the ceremony of Annunciation which, in the year 1725, fell exactly on Palm Sunday. This, and the fact that the text (written by Philipp Nicolai in 1597, btw) also mentions Jesus as the Son of David, makes this cantata perfectly eligible for Palm Sunday in my eyes; even if it has nothing to do with Lent at all. I am a free spirit, if it comes to interpreting music written for liturgical purposes. I can sell you the Christmas Oratorio as a perfect fit for Easter Monday, so watch out.

December 22, 2013

music for the 4. Sunday of Advent – Georg Philip Telemann: Lauter Wonne, lauter Freude

by ada

Telemann wrote this cantata for the 4. Sunday of Advent in the liturgical year of 1725 and published it in his collection of church cantatas Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst. It’s a sweet little piece of music which I’ve played myself on numerous occasions. More info about Telemann here – sorry, I’m too sick with this new sort of coughing flu to use my brain for anything else than to drink coffee and pet The Cat.

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