Posts tagged ‘Christmas’

January 4, 2015

Wien – December recap

by ada

Rathaus

Christmas lights Vienna

MuseumsQuartier 1

Vienna Stephansplatz pavement

handmade Christmas ornaments Vienna

Batala 1

Vienna 8

Graben

home 1

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January 2, 2015

M&M – the last of 2014

by ada

Mil

christmas tree

December 30, 2014

Linz before Christmas

by ada

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December 27, 2014

Wien – Christmas market at Karlsplatz

by ada

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December 26, 2014

M&M&The Cat (Christmas edition)

by ada

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December 26, 2014

music for the 2. Day of Christmas – Dietrich Buxtehude: Das neugeborne Kindelein, BuxWV 13

by ada

I originally intended to post this cantata for Christmas Day, but, alas, my scheduling skills aren’t the ones I can be proud of. You would think there’s no way to confuse 25 with 26, but you’re wrong. I’m really talented if it comes to creating chaos. Anyway. This is one of my favourite Christmas music ever (let’s forget the fact that this piece was written for New Year’s Eve, shall we?) and I am not willing to leave it out of this series just because I still can’t do proper maths after going to school for 25 years. Ha, ha.

Dietrich (orig. Diderik Hansen) Buxtehude, although of Danish origin, is one of the greatest names in the history of the Early(ish) German Baroque music. During his lifetime he was well acknowledged and of a considerable reputation, and served as a role model for many younger composers like Händel, Mattheson and even Johann Sebastian Bach who, at the age of twenty, walked more than 300 kms from Arnstadt to Lübeck to study with him. He (Bach) rejected Buxtehude’s offer to marry his oldest daughter, Anna Margareta, though. He wasn’t entirely opposed to the idea of marrying into the Buxtehude family, but his choice of wife would have been Dorothea Catrin, the youngest of Buxtehude’s six daughters. Unfortunately, Buxtehude was a man who liked things organised neatly everything to go the way of proper 17th century social customs, like successors marry the daughters of their predecessors and oldest daughters marry first. Poor Anna Margareta who, being somewhat over-proportioned and, at thirty, well over the desirable age, has a few years earlier already been rejected by both Johann Matheson and Georg Friedrich Händel. She obviously wasn’t that sweet little thing twenty-year-old composers dream of when applying for new jobs that come with a wife. Don’t worry, she did not end up as a spinster though: in 1707, at the age of 38, she wedded Johann Christian Schieferdecker, a composer of no real importance but a man of enough courage to take the risk of marrying a woman wanted by nobody. Brave guy.

And now let’s hope this post will go up on the 2. Day of Christmas instead of on Good Friday 2015.

December 25, 2014

music for the 1. Day of Christmas – Johann Valentin Rathgeber – 10 Pastorellen vor die Weynacht-Zeit, Op.22

by ada

Some sweet German pastoral songs by Johann Valentin Rathgeber, a Benedictine monk with explicit tendency towards rebellion and vagrancy; in honor of all those who, just like me, spent the first day of Christmas on the train and are spending the second day of it working.

Yes, this is a scheduled post.

Update: aaand this is the classic case of Scheduling Went Wrong. Ha! Happy 1st Day of Christmas.

December 25, 2014

music for Christmas Eve – Cristofaro Caresana: La Veglia

by ada

La Veglia, Cantata a 6 voci con violini “Per la Nascita di Nostro Signore” – a proper 17th century Christmas cantata by Cristofaro Caresana, an Englishman in New York a Venetian in Spanish Naples and proud composer of the earliest complete tarantella melody in the history of music. Happy Nativity!

December 21, 2014

music for the 4. Sunday of Advent – Samuel Capricornus: Adeste omnes fideles

by ada

I had grandiose plans for today’s music post – too bad I’ve had neither time nor energy to fulfill them. So, to make the best out of this situation, let’s listen to the motet Adeste omnes fideles composed by Samuel Capricornus; moved a lot, wrote cool music, died young. My kind of guy.

December 20, 2014

Wien – Christmas market at Belvedere

by ada

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December 14, 2014

music for the 3. Sunday of Advent – Johann Stadlmayr: Resonet in laudibus

by ada

Something short and sweet for Gaudete, the 3rd Sunday of Advent: the Christmas motet Resonet in laudibus, from the collection Moduli symphoniaci, in augustissima Christi nati celebritate et caeteris deinceps natalibus, et Purificatae Virginis, feriis, quinis, senis, septenis et pluribus vocibus concinendi of Johann Stadlmayr, published in 1629 in Innsbruck.

And, although Stadlmayr has only spent four years of his life in Salzburg (1603-1607), I’m determined to squeeze him also into the Salzburg Series, because I’m tricky as hell.

I can’t share a lot of interesting details about his life but the fact that he worked as a kind of butcher for six years, because he was unable to make a living out of music. Familiar situation, isn’t it? I love you, Johann Stadlmayr, you are my soulmate and bff forever.

December 12, 2014

Wien – the tree lights at the Wiener Christkindlmarkt

by ada

Rathasuplatz Vienna Christmas

Christmas lights at Rathausplatz Vienna 1

red heart shaped Christmas hearts at Rathausplatz Vienna

Vienna Rathausplatz Christmas lights

Christmas lights at Rathausplatz Vienna

Gummi bear lights at Rathausplatz Vienna 2

two violin-shaped Christmas lights at Rathausplatz Vienna 1

violin-shaped Christmas lights at Rathausplatz Vienna

December 11, 2014

Wien

by ada

Rotenturmstrasse

December 7, 2014

music for the 2. Sunday of Advent – Michel Corrette: Sinfonia V. from 6 Symphonies en quatuor, contenant les plus beaux Noëls François & étrangers

by ada

For the second Sunday of Advent let’s get back into my comfort zone padded with late(-ish) French Baroque music, and listen to one of the Christmas symphonies of Michel Corrette, obsessive writer of DIY music treatises, knight of the Order of Christ, cultivator of the beau berger mindset that flourished in the social circles of the 17th-18th century French noblesse and, last but not least, composer of noëls and other funny things, such as concertos with titles like La Femme est une grand embarras or La Servante au bon Tabac. 

Noëls are the traditional Christmas carols of the French, and back in those times it was a thing amongst French composers to write variations based upon them for the organ, but (to my best knowledge) it was Corrette whom first occurred to bind a few of them together as a set and call it a symphony. Here is No 5 of the 6 Symphonies en quatuor, contenant les plus beaux Noëls François & étrangers, avec des variations pour un 1er violon ou flûte, un 2d violon, alto & basse chiffrée, & pouvant s’exécuter à gr. orchestre à l’Office divin, published in Paris in 1781. Its last movement is based on the melody that was well-known in Baroque Europe under various names, such as Fuggi, fuggi, fuggi; La Mantovana and Noël Suisse. Today most people recognise it as the melody of Hatikvah, the national anthem of Israel.*

* If when I’m done with the Salzburg Series and all my other series I’m dreaming of doing in my (nonexistent) free hours, like the Musica Hebraica, the Folia, the Female Baroque Composers, the Love, War and Death, etc, etc, I’m definitely doing a post on the early music background of Hatikvah. It’s not a long story to tell, so there is actually some hope of this happening, haha**

** hopefully I will still live blog at age 83***

*** Telemann, Schütz and even Corrette were still mentally fit and active around that age so nothing is impossible

January 4, 2014

one must have a mind of winter

by ada

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The Cat Christmas

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December 29, 2013

Znojmo – by night

by ada

Znojmo

angel Znojmo

December 26, 2013

music for the 2. Day of Christmas – Grave and Vivace from Giuseppe Torelli’s “Concerto in forma di Pastorale per il Santissimio Natale”

by ada

My favourite interpretation* of Torelli‘s most famous Christmas Concerto, No. 6 from the twelve Concerti Grossi Op. 8, with the choreography of Jiří Kylián, performed by the Nederlands Dans Theater.

(The last 3 minutes of music is no Torelli anymore but the movement Lento from a contemporary composer, Lukas Foss‘ work, the Salomon Rossi Suite. Just because I couldn’t sleep if I’d let you think it still was.)

* Well, it’s not my favourite musical interpretation, because I’m very, very critical and picky if it comes to performing Baroque music (you don’t wanna know how many things can go wrong in a two minutes long minuet, haha); but this is definitely my favourite visual performance.

December 25, 2013

and the obligatory Christmas tree photo

by ada

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December 25, 2013

music for Christmas Day – Marc-Antoine Charpentier: Noëls pour les instruments, H. 351 & 354

by ada

French Christmas songs, in sweet, 17th century Théâtre-Français style.

December 25, 2013

music for Christmas Eve – Jakub Jan Ryba: Česká mše vánoční – Hej, mistře!

by ada

The first movement of the traditional (and very famous) Czech pastoral mass of Jakub Šimon Jan Ryba. With cute animations; because we are talking Baby Jesus here. In a proper Central European manner.

December 22, 2013

music for the 4. Sunday of Advent – Georg Philip Telemann: Lauter Wonne, lauter Freude

by ada

Telemann wrote this cantata for the 4. Sunday of Advent in the liturgical year of 1725 and published it in his collection of church cantatas Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst. It’s a sweet little piece of music which I’ve played myself on numerous occasions. More info about Telemann here – sorry, I’m too sick with this new sort of coughing flu to use my brain for anything else than to drink coffee and pet The Cat.

December 17, 2013

Bratislava – Christmas market

by ada

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Bratislava Roland Restaurant

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Bratislava skate ring

Christmas market Bratislava

Bratislava Christmas decoration 1

December 15, 2013

music for the 3. Sunday of Advent – Edmund Pascha: Vianočná omša F-dur

by ada

During the last two days of pre-Christmas daze in Bratislava, I totally got in the mood for Slovakian Christmas carols. While I proudly claim to know a lot about the composers of the Czech Baroque and Classical era (Zelenka! Ryba! Brixi! And of course, the flute people like Wanhal and Benda), the only Slovakian composer I’ve ever heard of is Johann Nepomuk Hummel, who wasn’t even Slovakian. Fortunately, YouTube is an endless source of music if you’re vague enough with your search terms, so that’s how I found Edmund Pascha and his Christmas Mass in F Major. According to Wikipedia*, Pascha was a Franciscan monk and organist during the late Baroque period, who also run under the pseudonym Claudianus Ostern. His two manuscripts Harmonia pastoralis and Prosae pastorales compositae et conscriptae a Patre Claudiano Ostern Solnae, are included in the so-called Žilinský kancionál, a collection of liturgical texts and music, which was put together around 1770 but was discovered only two hundred years later, in 1967. The Vianočná omša F-dur (Christmas Mass in F major), was also arranged as a passion play by Pascha’s contemporary and fellow Franciscan monk, the Hungarian Zrunek György.

And the music – it’s Slovakian folk tunes orchestrated in pretentious Baroque manner. Pure fun, with shepherd’s flutes and all. Enjoy.

* I know, I know. Wikipedia is not a reliable source for scientific research. Shame on me. Fortunately none of my former, oh so very famous and dedicated Historically Informed Performance Practice teachers read this blog, haha**

** hopefully

December 12, 2013

as dark as Christmas gets

by ada

szarvasagancs

szarvasagancs lámpával

December 12, 2013

Winter. Time to eat fat

by ada

food Vörösmarty tér Christmas market

yummy food

Vörösmarty tér

December 12, 2013

Budapest – Christmas market at Deák tér

by ada

Christmas market at Deák tér 3

Christmas market at Deák tér

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Christmas market at Deák tér 2

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December 8, 2013

my lamp art too: my light shall never fade

by ada

advent star

December 3, 2013

here in this ornamental winter

by ada

Christmas market at Kálvin tér

Christmas lights by FSZEK

Christmas market at Kálvin tér 5

November 30, 2013

yea, I have looked, and seen November there

by ada

My November list: cat comics, again, this time completely without words; a classic detective story; a disturbing book, with strange, overly philosophical discussions between a donkey and a monkey, related to the Holocaust; some Mozart fiction that pissed me off*; and a children’s book with cute drawings that made me lol in the bookstore while looking for a Santa present** for Móricka.

*  Why on Earth does a person, who is deeply convinced that Mozart! needs!! somebody else!!! to tune a piano, write a book about Mozart? Couldn’t she find a theme she is at least minimally acquainted with? I mean, people, can tune a piano and I’m definitely not Mozart. And what do you think, should I write a fiction book based on some quantum physics theory? I sure have as much knowledge of the behaviour of elementary particles as this woman has of Mozart and his era.

** Fyi, in Hungary Santa has nothing to do with Christmas. They both are totally different businesses, with Santa coming three weeks before Christmas. The Christmas presents are brought by Baby Jesus or, as in my non-Christian family that still celebrates Christmas, by the Baby Angel (because a celestial genderless infant is clearly a much better choice than a divine neonate, yes).

November readings

November 29, 2013

Wien – Christmas market at Maria-Theresien-Platz

by ada

Weichnachtsdorf Wien Maria-Theresien-Platz 3

Weichnachtsdorf Wien Maria-Theresien-Platz 2

Weichnachtsdorf Wien Maria-Theresien-Platz 1

Christmas ornaments at Weichnachtsdorf Wien Maria-Theresien-Platz

Weichnachtsdorf Wien Maria-Theresien-Platz Museumsquartier

Christmas ornaments at Weichnachtsdorf Wien Maria-Theresien-Platz 1

Weichnachtsdorf Wien Maria-Theresien-Platz

Weichnachtsdorf Wien Maria-Theresien-Platz 4

Naturhistorisches Museum Wien

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