Posts tagged ‘Easter Monday’

May 17, 2015

Easter Monday

by ada

Untitled 60

Untitled 50

Untitled 88

Untitled 119

Untitled 101

Untitled 33

Untitled 53

Untitled 195

Untitled 118

Untitled 44

Untitled 116

Untitled 143

Untitled 160

Untitled 152

Untitled 97

Untitled 159

Untitled 90

Untitled 150

Untitled 126

Advertisements
April 6, 2015

music for Easter Monday – Aria “Seele, deine Spezereien” from Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Oratorium Festo Paschali”, BWV 249

by ada

For my last music post of this Lent/Easter period let’s listen to one of the Great Traverso Moments of the Bach cantatas: Seele, deine Spezereien from the Easter Oratorio. The first version of it was performed almost exactly 290 years ago, on 1725 April 1. And, although I tend to find that Johann Adolf Scheibe‘s criticism of Bach’s “allzugrosse Kunst” actually has some truth in it, this music is still much more beautiful than anything else written during the past 290 years.

April 21, 2014

music for Easter Monday – Jacques Champion de Chambonnières: Paschalia

by ada

For Easter Monday I chose a short (not even 2 minutes long) dance movement by one of the best French harpsichord players of the 17th century, Jacques Champion de Chambonnières. He served at the court of both Louis XIII and his son, Louis XIV, and among his pupils were Louis, Charles and François Couperin and Jean-Henri d’Anglebert. Although he was a very skilled musician who was held in high regard by his contemporaries, he also had his shortcomings that costed him his career: he couldn’t play the figured bass well enough to accompany the operas of Lully. And, as you might remember from yesterday’s post, Lully was a very influential man in the court of the Sun King (actually, he ruled the whole  17th century French music life. And he ruled it with a firm hand). So Chambonnières lost the game and had to go. He died a poor man, leaving exactly 142 small dance movements behind as a musical legacy. He published two collections of them during his lifetime, but some of them, as this short Paschalia, exist still only in manuscript.

What I love about this short piece of music is that it is like a dream within a dream: it has a hidden passacaille towards its end that, despite of being only 9 bars long (whole fifteen seconds in this recording), is a complete, perfect little piece in itself.

Because that’s how easy I am to please. You can buy my heart with fifteen seconds of ostinato.

April 1, 2013

music for Easter Monday – Aria “Süß und rein muß der Christen Passah seyn” from the Easter Cantata “Weg mit Sodoms gift’gen Früchten”, TWV1:1534 by Georg Philipp Telemann

by ada

Telemann wrote a whole cycle of cantatas for the liturgical year and published them in a two-bands collection, under the title Der Harmonische Gottesdienst. I chose this aria from the cantata written for Easter Sunday in 1725 for my last post of the Easter series, because I think Telemann was a genius and I like how this short piece of music shows the purity of the new life after the feast of the Resurrection.

P.S.: I don’t really like the singer’s voice, but well, nothing is perfect on Earth. I’ve already learnt to accept the need of making compromises in life.

%d bloggers like this: