Posts tagged ‘hussar’

September 22, 2013

Budapest – Nemzeti Vágta

by ada

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March 15, 2012

by the God of the Hungarians

by ada

Hungarian history is a long, straight line of tragical, ill-fated revolutions against different suppressive authorities. Being genetically coded for unhappiness, we insist to remember and celebrate all of them. Today is the anniversary of our unsuccessful revolution against the Habsburg empire in 1848.

We went for a walk to the castle district to see some of the festivities.

The weather was beautiful:

The street decorations were appropriate, festive and family friendly:

Hungarian folk music was played with various instruments:

There was opportunity to dance (or just to look at the professional folk dancers):

Masters of traditional Hungarian handwork presented their crafting process and sold their art:

People had picnic on the grass or took a stroll down the streets:

Children had fun:

One could buy traditional, painted Hungarian gingerbread and our national stuffed dragon Süsü, who is famous for having only one head but a happy soul:

There were plenty of delicious treats to choose from:

And of course there were also Hussars in picturesque robes, their facial hair styled in the Hungarian way. We are a martial nation, there were even times when whole Europe feared our arrows. All those times are gone more than a thousand years ago but we still proudly remember. We have a good (even if somewhat selective) memory and a collective unconscious Jung could be proud of.

People were proud of being Hungarian:

But even because we are Hungarians and proud of it, none of our holidays can pass without politics and demonstrations:

And well. Ehm. How to say it nicely. Dear Poland. If you want him, take him. For free. Asap.

The title of the post comes from a poem that is traditionally recited during the festivities every year and was written by the poet Petőfi Sándor, who died in the revolution at the age of 26. You can read the whole (terrible) translation here.

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