Posts tagged ‘Italian Baroque’

April 3, 2015

music for Maundy Thursday – “Eia Mater” from Antonio Vivaldi’s “Stabat Mater” RV 621

by ada

For all the stunning church music Antonio Vivaldi composed, he has never gotten to writing a proper passion oratorio. Fortunately, he did compose a Stabat Mater in 1721, the seventh movement of which we can now listen to. Performed by Philippe Jaroussky, because after 8 years of studying the long gone aesthetics of past societies, I only enjoy my soprano arias if sung by males.

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March 30, 2015

music for Holy Monday – Aria “Sileant Zephyri” from Antonio Vivaldi’s motet “Filiae maestae Jerusalem” RV 638

by ada

According to Antonio Vivaldi, this is how nature mourns the death of Christ – the second movement of one of the two motets he composed as introductions for his now lost Miserere.

June 16, 2012

music of the week – Monteverdi: Sì dolce è ‘l tormento

by ada

This song is on the Top Ten Forever-list of mine, and I am able to force it even into my Salzburg Early Music Composers series, despite of the fact that all Monteverdi has to do with Salzburg is that his opera L’Orfeo was performed here several times between 1614 and 1619, thank to Francesco Rasi, a famous tenor singer of the time, who sung its leading role at the first performance in 1607 in Mantua, and who brought the scores with him, when he fled to Salzburg in 1612 (after trying to murder his stepmother, ahem, those were the days, my friend, those were the days).

April 3, 2012

365/94

by ada

For every day of the Holy Week I decided to share a piece of music, written originally for this time of the year, mostly for the church  services. It is very difficult for me to choose from the huge amount of beautiful things that came to existence during the past few hundred years – even if I stick to the period I’m most familiar with, the late 17th and early 18th centuries, it means still too much of goodness to leave out. So I’ll try to avoid the very famous hits, like the Bach-Passions, and present some works of smaller composers or pieces less known.

Today’s music is Stabat Mater from Giovanni Felice Sances, an Italian baroque composer of the 17th century, who was among the first composers to write his melodies upon the so-called lament bass, an (often chromatically) descending tetrachord. In the presentation of Arpeggiata and Philippe Jaroussky, who, in my opinion, is one of the most talented early music performers nowadays.

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