Posts tagged ‘Johann Sebastian Bach’

January 1, 2018

music for the first day of 2018 – Aria “Laß uns, o höchster Gott” from the cantata “Jesu, nun sei gepreiset” BWV 41 by Johann Sebastian Bach

by ada

Let’s start 2018 with an aria first performed exactly 293 years ago – on a Monday, just like today – and wish for the same Johann Sebastian Bach once did: that in a year from today we’ll still have all the reasons to be thankful to God.

April 6, 2015

music for Easter Monday – Aria “Seele, deine Spezereien” from Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Oratorium Festo Paschali”, BWV 249

by ada

For my last music post of this Lent/Easter period let’s listen to one of the Great Traverso Moments of the Bach cantatas: Seele, deine Spezereien from the Easter Oratorio. The first version of it was performed almost exactly 290 years ago, on 1725 April 1. And, although I tend to find that Johann Adolf Scheibe‘s criticism of Bach’s “allzugrosse Kunst” actually has some truth in it, this music is still much more beautiful than anything else written during the past 290 years.

December 31, 2014

music for the last day of 2014 – Johann Sebastian Bach: Gottlob! nun geht das Jahr zu Ende, BWV 28

by ada

All I can say about 2014 is exactly what Erdmann Neumeister, the librettist of this cantata has already put into words in an oh-so-appropriate manner: thank God it’s over.

December 26, 2014

music for the 2. Day of Christmas – Dietrich Buxtehude: Das neugeborne Kindelein, BuxWV 13

by ada

I originally intended to post this cantata for Christmas Day, but, alas, my scheduling skills aren’t the ones I can be proud of. You would think there’s no way to confuse 25 with 26, but you’re wrong. I’m really talented if it comes to creating chaos. Anyway. This is one of my favourite Christmas music ever (let’s forget the fact that this piece was written for New Year’s Eve, shall we?) and I am not willing to leave it out of this series just because I still can’t do proper maths after going to school for 25 years. Ha, ha.

Dietrich (orig. Diderik Hansen) Buxtehude, although of Danish origin, is one of the greatest names in the history of the Early(ish) German Baroque music. During his lifetime he was well acknowledged and of a considerable reputation, and served as a role model for many younger composers like Händel, Mattheson and even Johann Sebastian Bach who, at the age of twenty, walked more than 300 kms from Arnstadt to Lübeck to study with him. He (Bach) rejected Buxtehude’s offer to marry his oldest daughter, Anna Margareta, though. He wasn’t entirely opposed to the idea of marrying into the Buxtehude family, but his choice of wife would have been Dorothea Catrin, the youngest of Buxtehude’s six daughters. Unfortunately, Buxtehude was a man who liked things organised neatly everything to go the way of proper 17th century social customs, like successors marry the daughters of their predecessors and oldest daughters marry first. Poor Anna Margareta who, being somewhat over-proportioned and, at thirty, well over the desirable age, has a few years earlier already been rejected by both Johann Matheson and Georg Friedrich Händel. She obviously wasn’t that sweet little thing twenty-year-old composers dream of when applying for new jobs that come with a wife. Don’t worry, she did not end up as a spinster though: in 1707, at the age of 38, she wedded Johann Christian Schieferdecker, a composer of no real importance but a man of enough courage to take the risk of marrying a woman wanted by nobody. Brave guy.

And now let’s hope this post will go up on the 2. Day of Christmas instead of on Good Friday 2015.

April 14, 2014

music for Palm Sunday – 1. Choral from Johann Sebastian Bach’s cantata “Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern” (BWV 1)

by ada

The time has come again for the Holy Week Series, for the third year in a row. I’m sure you all are as happy as I am to witness my musicology writer career blossoming, haha. I am kind of late with Palm Sunday music though since we’re already deep into Holy Monday, but life has been pretty busy lately and left me no time for this blog.

I had a weird Palm Sunday, so I decided to post a similarly weird music, because I am vindictive.

The only cantata Johann Sebastian Bach ever composed for Palm Sunday is the cantata Himmelskönig, sei willkommen (BWV 182) which I have already posted last year. At the times Bach served in Leipzig, the practice of tempus clausum (closed time), which means that during the weeks of Lent and Advent no festivities and also no music at the liturgy other than Passion plays are allowed, was kept quite strictly. The only exception was the ceremony of Annunciation which, in the year 1725, fell exactly on Palm Sunday. This, and the fact that the text (written by Philipp Nicolai in 1597, btw) also mentions Jesus as the Son of David, makes this cantata perfectly eligible for Palm Sunday in my eyes; even if it has nothing to do with Lent at all. I am a free spirit, if it comes to interpreting music written for liturgical purposes. I can sell you the Christmas Oratorio as a perfect fit for Easter Monday, so watch out.

December 1, 2013

music for the 1st Sunday of Advent – Johann Sebastian Bach: Cantata “Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland”, BWV 62

by ada

The great success (ha! ha! two whole page views per day!) of the Holy Week Series inspired me to expand my musicology writer career to another part of the liturgical year: Advent and Christmas. You’re welcome.

Before the depression I had a thing for no-name German composers that didn’t really make it into the musical canon, like Johann Caspar Ferdinand Fischer or Cajetan Anton Adlgasser. Well, it’s over.* I’m all “all we need is Bach” nowadays. So for now, Johann Sebastian Bach it is, the cantata he’s composed for the first day of Advent in 1724; on the German translation of the ancient Ambrosian hymn Veni Redemptor Gentium.

* My interest in early music also seems to vanish very quickly. I hope, I will recover someday. Having spent 8 years of my life with something I can’t even enjoy anymore would be sort of tragic.

July 25, 2013

music of the week – Johann Ernst Eberlin: Toccata and Fuga in D minor

by ada

Todays music is Toccata and Fuga in D minor, composed by Johann Ernst Eberlin, organist of the Salzburg Dom between 1726-1763. It could easily be mistaken for a particularly uninspired counterpoint study of Johann Sebastian Bach, because Eberlin was sort of old-fashioned, which is something I rather like in music (I will never forgive Richard Wagner what he did to tonality). I find this piece a bit boring though, as well as Eberlin, but in a way he is totally right: you can’t go wrong with good old quintfallsequenz; it never fails to do its job of touching the hearts.

March 31, 2013

music for Easter Sunday – Der Himmel lacht, die Erde jubilieret, BWV 31 by Johann Sebastian Bach

by ada

Today’s music is the first choir, Der Himmel lacht, die Erde jubilieret from the cantata of the same title, written by Johann Sebastian Bach for the Easter Sunday of the year 1715, during his Weimar years. I wish I could identify myself with its jubilant atmosphere but well, neither the Heaven laughs nor does the Earth exult, because it actually snows again and I’m already so sick of this winter, it really feels like giving up, lying down and dying. Not exactly that brassy resurrexit-feeling one would like to have on Easter Sunday.

P.S.: Last year’s post was something Hungarian: Surrexit Christus hodie by Esterházy Pál. You can listen to it  here.

March 30, 2013

music for Holy Saturday – Jan Dismas Zelenka: Miserere in с, ZWV 57

by ada

For Holy Saturday (or Great Saturday as we call it in Hungary) is a music that was never intended to be part of the Easter liturgy: the first movement of Jan Dismas Zelenka‘s Miserere, my favourite Miserere of all times. Zelenka is the man I’m seriously planning to marry ever since I’ve first heard his music (that tells a lot about how stormy my love life lately is) (well, at least it isn’t an imaginary affair, because he definitely did exist) (some three hundred years ago, ehem). He was also highly valued by Johann Sebastian Bach who even asked him for some professional advice on composing. And that means something, I dare say. So it’s not just some girly crush – Zelenka was really that cool.

P.S.: Last year’s post about the cantatas Boi Beshalom and Kol HaNeshama by Cristiano Giuseppe Lidarti.

March 29, 2013

music for Good Friday – Aria “Es ist vollbracht” from Passio Secundum Johannem, BWV 245 by Johann Sebastian Bach

by ada

Today’s music ist the aria Es ist vollbracht from the St. John’s Passion of Johann Sebastian Bach. It doesn’t need any comments.

P.S.: Find last year’s Good Friday post, Maria (sopra la Carpinese) here.

March 24, 2013

music for Palm Sunday – Johann Sebastian Bach: Himmelskönig, sei willkommen (Cantata BWV 182)

by ada

During the Holy Week I will do a music post every day just like I did last year; let’s call it tradition. I will stay strictly Baroque, because that’s where I feel comfortable even if I didn’t touch my instruments since the outbreak of my depression, and that means already one and a half years without playing. I sometimes wonder if I ever will get back to my real life of libraries and awesome music. It seems so far away now.

For Palm Sunday let’s have the king of everything Baroque, Johann Sebastian Bach. He wrote this Cantata almost exactly 300 years ago and it is still more beautiful than most of the music others managed to create during those past 300 years.

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