Posts tagged ‘opera’

December 22, 2017

and Art shall awaken and Love shall sing

by ada

That first tone.

And the lute player at 7:40.

That’s what music is about.

Advertisements
November 19, 2015

Bregenz – Seebühne 2015

by ada

Seebühne Turandot Bregenz 9

Seebühne Turandot Bregenz 1

Seebühne Turandot Bregenz 13

Bregenz Seebühne 4

Bregenz Seebühne 2

Seebühne Turandot Bregenz 12

Seebühne Turandot Bregenz 23

February 18, 2014

music of the week – Francesco Rasi: Ahi, fuggitivo ben

by ada

I have mentioned Francesco Rasi before: he was that wild, adventurous, and quite impetuous singer, who took the script of Claudio Monteverdi‘s opera L’Orfeo with him to Salzburg, where he, with the help of Archbishop Markus Sittikus, produced and sung the leading role of the first opera performance in the German world ever and became thereby responsible for that exaggerated Teuton love of operas, which, some 250 years later, resulted in Wagner‘s Götterdämmerung. I try really hard not to blame him for it.

Rasi was also on quite bad terms with his stepmother, and after murdering her servant who was in charge for her estate, he tried to kill her too. He didn’t succeed though and had to flee. He was condemned to death by the court of Arezzo so he took refuge at first in Prague and then in Salzburg. Apart of his murderous nature, Rasi was a very talented, virtuoso and well-known singer of his time, who was a student of Giulio Caccini and whom “not only Italy but even all Europe venerated.” * ** He also played various instruments and composed a few volumes of music, mostly short songs in the early seventeenth century style of pure monody. One of these songs is Ahi, fuggitivo ben from his 1608 collection Vaghezze di Musica per una voce sola, where he, from a perspective of the abandoned lover, complains about the misery of being a fugitive. The moral of the story? Don’t try to murder your relatives (or anybody, actually) if you want to lead a relaxed life and plan to retire at your birthplace.

* letter from Don Gregorio Rasi to his nephew Giulio Francesco Rasi around 1650

** He was also deeply impressed by the weapons of the Hungarian artillery which he encountered during his 1601 travels. Am I the only one to find this small detail of his life quite charming? Oh, those times when music was still real as life! Why, why do I have to live in this boring age of global warming, genetically modified food and tumblr aesthetics?

September 9, 2012

365/245

by ada

Watching Puccini’s La bohème in Kapitelplatz, with Netrebko as Mimi. Romantic opera is not really my thing, but I have to be fair. She definitely can sing. 

I guess you are already used to the crappy quality of my night picťures. Such a luck that the purpose of this project is not making good photos, haha. 

August 24, 2012

365/235

by ada

Watching Purcell’s King Arthur on the screen at Kapitelplatz. It ended with a storm – of course! everything ends with ice-cold rain in my life lately – , so we were all wearing the obligatory free ORF rain jacket uniform.

August 5, 2012

365/217

by ada

Georg Friedrich Händel’s opera, Giulio Cesare in Egitto, on the big Siemens screen at Kapitelplatz. I left in the middle of the second act, because after thirteen hours of work is even Andreas Scholl unable to make me forget that, well, this isn’t the greatest Baroque opera of all times.

P.S.: I really don’t know how did I manage to produce this retro combination of colours, but I quite like it. Photographers do lots of hard editing to get the same results, while, actually, all you need for it is a bad camera.

May 27, 2012

365/148

by ada

My camera luckily recovered from yesterday’s bad mood, so this is the wall of the Steintheater in the Hellbrunn woods. On the 31st August 1617 Claudio Monteverdi’s opera L’Orfeo was performed here. It was the first opera production on German-speaking terrain ever.

April 5, 2012

365/96

by ada

Today’s music is the first movement of the oratorio Agonia di Cristo (Le Ultime Sette Parole), based on the seven last words of Christ, written by Niccolò Jommelli, one of the most prominent composers of the Italian galant opera. Its style is a bit too late for fitting in the category of baroque passion music, but oh, do I love the obligato bassoon part!

July 26, 2010

hommage à Mozart

by ada

June 22, 2010

workin’ day and night

by ada

%d bloggers like this: