Posts tagged ‘Salzburg’

December 14, 2014

music for the 3. Sunday of Advent – Johann Stadlmayr: Resonet in laudibus

by ada

Something short and sweet for Gaudete, the 3rd Sunday of Advent: the Christmas motet Resonet in laudibus, from the collection Moduli symphoniaci, in augustissima Christi nati celebritate et caeteris deinceps natalibus, et Purificatae Virginis, feriis, quinis, senis, septenis et pluribus vocibus concinendi of Johann Stadlmayr, published in 1629 in Innsbruck.

And, although Stadlmayr has only spent four years of his life in Salzburg (1603-1607), I’m determined to squeeze him also into the Salzburg Series, because I’m tricky as hell.

I can’t share a lot of interesting details about his life but the fact that he worked as a kind of butcher for six years, because he was unable to make a living out of music. Familiar situation, isn’t it? I love you, Johann Stadlmayr, you are my soulmate and bff forever.

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March 18, 2014

on the road

by ada

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February 18, 2014

music of the week – Francesco Rasi: Ahi, fuggitivo ben

by ada

I have mentioned Francesco Rasi before: he was that wild, adventurous, and quite impetuous singer, who took the script of Claudio Monteverdi‘s opera L’Orfeo with him to Salzburg, where he, with the help of Archbishop Markus Sittikus, produced and sung the leading role of the first opera performance in the German world ever and became thereby responsible for that exaggerated Teuton love of operas, which, some 250 years later, resulted in Wagner‘s Götterdämmerung. I try really hard not to blame him for it.

Rasi was also on quite bad terms with his stepmother, and after murdering her servant who was in charge for her estate, he tried to kill her too. He didn’t succeed though and had to flee. He was condemned to death by the court of Arezzo so he took refuge at first in Prague and then in Salzburg. Apart of his murderous nature, Rasi was a very talented, virtuoso and well-known singer of his time, who was a student of Giulio Caccini and whom “not only Italy but even all Europe venerated.” * ** He also played various instruments and composed a few volumes of music, mostly short songs in the early seventeenth century style of pure monody. One of these songs is Ahi, fuggitivo ben from his 1608 collection Vaghezze di Musica per una voce sola, where he, from a perspective of the abandoned lover, complains about the misery of being a fugitive. The moral of the story? Don’t try to murder your relatives (or anybody, actually) if you want to lead a relaxed life and plan to retire at your birthplace.

* letter from Don Gregorio Rasi to his nephew Giulio Francesco Rasi around 1650

** He was also deeply impressed by the weapons of the Hungarian artillery which he encountered during his 1601 travels. Am I the only one to find this small detail of his life quite charming? Oh, those times when music was still real as life! Why, why do I have to live in this boring age of global warming, genetically modified food and tumblr aesthetics?

February 1, 2014

music of the week – Anton Cajetan Adlgasser: Sinfonia in E flat Major CatAd 15:10

by ada

Anton Cajetan Adlgasser, organist of the Salzburg Cathedral between 1750-1777 and composer of countless Schuldramas for the University of Salzburg, that are all forgotten by now, is remembered mostly for being the father of Maria Victoria Adlgasser, Nannerl Mozart‘s bff, and for writing the third, now missing part of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart‘s first oratorio, Die Schuldigkeit des ersten Gebots (the second part was composed by Michael Haydn) (fyi, Mozart was only eleven years old at the time when he finished it. What does your eleven years old child do with their life?) (Okay, I’m obviously kidding now. Mozart couldn’t write a sentence in proper German at the age of thirty. He clearly had his weak points too).

Adlgasser became a victim of Archbishop Sigismund von Schrattenbach‘s generous policy of providing his staff with free wine, and suffered a deadly stroke  at the age of 48 while playing the organ. Being a musician is a dangerous profession. Remember Lully who died of blood poisoning after penetrating his own foot with his baton while conducting a march?

January 6, 2014

music of the week – Carl Heinrich Biber: Concerto a quattro per la chiesa

by ada

Altough I no longer live in Salzburg, I decided to carry on with the Salzburg Series, because I don’t like things unfinished. There are really not that many Baroque composers that have anything to do with Salzburg and have some surviving works, so it’s a real shame it took 18 months for me to cover only 8 of them. I’ll try to speed up and finish this project because I have already my next one in mind.

So for today I picked Carl Heinrich Biber, the sixth and most talented son of Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber von Bibern. There is not much to know about him except that he lived, worked and died in Salzburg and loved to compose for those excellent and virtuoso trombone players of the Salzburg court orchestra like Thomas Gschladt (although I know of no written evidence of them having been in contact, but hey, Salzburg is and were always the provinces a small town where everybody is the cousin of everybody, even in our most recent days, haha).

From all the four pieces of his work YouTube offers I chose Concerto a quattro per la chiesa for strings. It’s a disturbing piece of music which The Cat very much dislikes – I hope at least some of you appreciate Carl Heinrich’s courage of using dissonances so freely in a harmony worshiping era.

PS.: Okay, so it’s not allowed to embed this video, so go over there for it.

December 31, 2013

the year is going, let him go

by ada

2013 wasn’t exactly a bad year for me but it wasn’t a good one either. It was like just milling around, one step forward two steps back while nothing really makes sense and nothing ever happens. I’m quite relieved that this year is finally over. Yay 2014!

In contrast to last year this time I have numerous New Year’s Resolutions. Most of them are private, that I won’t discuss here. My resolutions regarding this blog are to

  1. be more personal. At some point along my way through 2013 this blog stopped being my personal diary and became a travel blog or rather a backup place where I uploaded some of the halfway acceptable photos I took of buildings. Which is fine too, I guess, but becoming so neutral was never my intention.
  2. post less and select and sort out my photos more strictly. Sometimes I really envy those beautiful, artistic photo blogs with simple designs and meaningful pictures and I have to remind myself that the purpose of my blog is not to cause visual joy to anybody out there but to collect and save my memories. Crappy pictures for crappy memories. Haha.
  3. improve my photography. Because even if this place most likely will never evolve into a beautiful, artistic photo blog, I still want to learn how to make my indoor pictures less blurry.
  4. write more about music. I totally get that nobody likes my music posts but me, haha, but hey, it’s my blog where I do as I please. And I don’t want to completely forget the person I was before the depression. That nice and intelligent person that had opinions and knowledge and was talented and her life wasn’t centered around iv pumps and artificial hearts. Not that there is anything wrong with artificial hearts.

So let’s remember some of the nice and/or important things I did or that happened in 2013:

I started the year with fireworks in Salzburg.

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Milo was born shortly after that.

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Spring was beautiful (when it wasn’t raining).

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I visited 30 cities in 6 different countries during the year (I don’t count Salzburg and Budapest where I actually live and not just visit). My favourite places were rainy Venice…

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…and the beautiful synagogue of Třebíč.

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 I also paid a visit to the Dachau Concentration Camp.

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I hiked mountains…

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… got wet by waterfalls…

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…took boats to reach islands…

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…and cable cars to reach peaks.

Untersberg cable car

After a more than twenty years long hiatus I actually made two zoo visits this year. A trend I definitely want to continue.

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I became an expert in mountain cemetery art…

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…and in carillon mechanics.

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I celebrated the opening of the Salzburger Festspiele…

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…documented folk festivals…

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…and politically critical art exhibitions.

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I bought my first DSLR. Technically spoken, it’s an SLT, but honestly, for me the definition doesn’t make any difference. I am not entirely happy with it, maybe it’s the kit lens and its huge barrel distortion and poor focusing skills; but it’s nice to have control over my choices. Unfortunately, I don’t really have any control over anything yet, so a lot of blurry, over or underexposed, out of focus photos are to come till I learn how to handle it properly. Don’t be too hard on me if I post the sixty-fourth slightly washed-out picture of the same blurred flower or distorted building. I also try not to over-edit my photos in order to make them less painful but it’s hard, really hard.

I also let my hair cut, after wearing it long for about ten years. This decision didn’t make me more beautiful (I still haven’t found out what makes me more beautiful, haha) but man, does it feel good to have it short! On my Good Hair Days I look like Dora The Explorer. On my Bad Hair Days… Oh well. On my Bad Hair Days I look a lot like Pumuckl. I usually have Bad Hair Days (not that this makes any difference). (Also, you’re welcome for my precious self-portrait, displayed in the true manner of the Mysterious Blogger’s Awkward Bedroom Mirror Selfie. At least it isn’t a Common Restroom Mirror Selfie entitled “what I wore today”. And you really can’t claim that I’d overflow this blog with my own self-portraits).

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In 2013 I also quit my job (twice) and moved (twice). I see a certain pattern here, haha. I guess I’m addicted to this feeling of freedom that comes with quitting jobs.

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I left Salzburg…

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…and moved back to Budapest for a while.

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I started a course to specialize in Critical Care Nursing and Anaesthesiology, mostly because I missed using my brain and was so bored with the job they call nursing in Austria. Hungarian Health Care System has its (major? giant? monumental?) flaws but at least it isn’t boring for all that take actively part in it. Stressful? Yes. Boring? No.

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I also had some family time with relatives I haven’t seen in two years…

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…and went a bit heavy on Christmas markets to overcompensate last year’s complete lack of festive feelings.

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At the end of the year Móricka turned two. He celebrated with smashing his cake to the floor. Unintentionally, of course.

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So this was (the nicer part of) my 2013. Let’s move on, please?

November 17, 2013

things and places I will miss when I leave Salzburg

by ada

This field, with the view of the Festung. So many adventures of mine started here.

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The times when I was living in the same house with Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus Paracelsus von Hohenheim. Or with his ghost. Oh well. At least with his memory.

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Cemetery art. If I die (and I undoubtedly will) I want to be buried à la Salisburgensis.

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The mountains. I’ve never been that lowland-girl. I need my clouds and peaks and high places to feel good.

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Leopold Mozart. I really am the last to question the rare genius of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart but in my opinion the one who did the big job, was his father, Leopold. Music training in the 17-18th century is one of my pet peeve themes (I actually wrote one of my Bachelor theses about teaching children instruments using entirely historical sources already from beginner’s level), and I can’t stress enough the importance of a good teacher. Developing a close relationship with your teacher ist actually unavoidable while learning an instrument and your teacher makes you or breaks you. A good teacher makes you. You get my point. So I love Leopold Mozart way more than I love his son. His son was simply a genius. But Papa Mozart was the man who gave him the opportunity to be one. And that’s the real job, I tell you.

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The house blessings and stories painted below the roofline of those pastel-coloured houses.

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The dialect which I’m just starting to finally understand.

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The Candela shop. Christmas all year round.

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This weird little garden by the bike road under the Staatsbrücke, made and cared for by Mister Wolfgang. I have no idea though, who he actually is, but hey, Mr. Wolfgang, thank you!

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Kitschy Mozart-souvenirs. I’ve grown to love them during the last one and a half years. (I know. It’s embarrassing. But I don’t care. I feel no shame.)

Mozart souvenirs

Sphaera. He looks like the kind of man a girl could trust and marry.

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The guild signs.

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People wearing dirndl. Like, all the time. They wear it to church, to the coffee-house, to meet friends, to the Festspiele, just because it’s Sunday (Monday, Tuesday, etc). Dirndl is real, at least here in Salzburg. My Inner Princess, who is usually pretty much suppressed by the jeans-wearing Everyday Me, totally loves it.

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The easy access to grass-fed, organic meat and row dairy.

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The open-air free opera movies or, the Festspiele Of The Poor, which I visited on numerous occasions. I’ve never set foot in the Festspielhaus, though. Those 700 euros tickets are somewhat out of my budget. Ha, ha.

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Carillon music. I will really miss hearing those out-of-tune Mozart arias and German folk tunes three times a day.

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The roses of Mirabell…

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…and Pegasus, of course.

Pegasus in Mirabellgarten Salzburg

November 10, 2013

Salzburg – Stolpersteine

by ada

Stolpersteine Salzburg Petersfriedhof

Stolpersteine Salzburg Förtsch and Neunhäuserer

Stolperstein Salzburg Theodor Kurtz 1

Stopersteine Salzburg Children

Stoperstein Salzburg Alfred Schulhof

Stolpersteine Salzburg Judengasse

Stoperstein Salzburg Anna Maria Wahl

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Stolpersteine Salzburg Johann and Marie Haslauer Jehova's Wittnesses

Stolperstein Salzburg Agathe Herzenberger

October 23, 2013

Salzburg – the Trick Fountains of Schloss Hellbrunn

by ada

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October 23, 2013

Salzburg – Schloss Hellbrunn

by ada

Hellbrunn solar clock

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Hellbrunn unicorn

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Hellbrunn painted walls

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October 17, 2013

Salzburg – Mülln

by ada

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October 17, 2013

Salzburg – Monikapforte

by ada

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October 16, 2013

the place where Germany meets Austria

by ada

One of the most magnificent part of the Austrian-German border is the Untersberg, the pride and proud of the people of Salzburg. Its history is overcrowded with mythical creatures like emperors with ever-growing beards, dwarfs, witches and pretty mountain women who wear only white and like to pick handsome young humans to father them some children.

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Untersberg cable car house

Just take the cable car and simply vanish in Nothing.

Untersberg cable car

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Once safely arrived at the top, try to find your way in the fog without falling down from rocks into invisible depths.

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Admire the alpine flora and some leftover objects of the human civilisation.

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dry grass in fog

pines at Untersberg

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Reach the Geiereck (Vulture’s Corner).

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Look over Austria…

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…and then Germany.

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Oh well. Maybe you’d better visit this place on a nice and sunny summer day instead of at the beginning of Fog Season, which with its ten months per year is the longest season in Salzburg.

Wait for the sun to come out.

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Go over to another peak, the Salzburger Hochtron. Meet (the signs of) fellow travellers, pass memorials for the fallen members of the WW2 Mountain Troops and people who failed at hiking the same trail you’re walking right now.

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Memorial Bergtruppen Untersberg

Do you see the tiny cross at the top? That’s your destination.

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stairs to Salzburger Hochtron

Now you are at the top pf the world, high above the clouds, where the sky is always blue and the sun always shines.

Untersberg view

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October 11, 2013

two campers in cloud country

by ada

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Untersberg people

Untersberg bank

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October 9, 2013

how to be an alpine daw

by ada

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alpine daw flies over Untersberg

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September 24, 2013

and that’s why I love living in the Altstadt

by ada

The view from our staircase window:

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And from the neighbouring street:

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September 24, 2013

Salzburg – Rupertikirtag

by ada

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September 22, 2013

ring them bells ye heathen from the city that dreams

by ada

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September 21, 2013

Salzburg – the ground beneath my feet

by ada

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September 20, 2013

Salzburg – Mirabell in monochrome

by ada

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Sound of Music

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Mirabellgarten

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September 20, 2013

home is where the music is

by ada

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September 17, 2013

the waterfall of Golling (through a wet lens)

by ada

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September 17, 2013

Golling – the cat of the castle

by ada

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September 17, 2013

Golling

by ada

gollinger street

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gollinger church

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Golling castle

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gollinger museum

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August 31, 2013

the Gnomes of Mirabell

by ada

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August 29, 2013

all that you can’t leave behind

by ada

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August 28, 2013

let thine own times as an old story be

by ada

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August 26, 2013

beautiful lofty things

by ada

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August 26, 2013

Salzburg – the flowers of St. Peter

by ada

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August 9, 2013

music of the week – Passacaglia from Georg Muffats collection Apparatus Musico-Organisticus

by ada

Georg Muffat was a fellow musician of Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber at the Salzburg court of the Archbishops Max Gandolph Graf von Kuenburg and Johann Ernst Thun, between 1678-1690. He was lucky enough to study both the French and the Italian way of making music (oh those honest and uncomplicated times of the 17th century with only two main trends to compare and to believe in) and to meet the two leading and trend-creating personalities of the era: Jean-Baptiste Lully (yay to the French) and Arcangelo Corelli (hurrah for the Italian). In the preface of his collections Florilegium primum and Florilegium secundum, he gives very detailed instructions* on how to play “in the French manner”, like how to hold the bow, how to place the fingers, etc. He also claimed (himself) to be the very first musician to introduce the French style to the German-speaking part of Europe, which I’m not sure is a historically true statement, but he believed so. Whatever, he did a tremendous job in creating the very beginnings of the so-called “mixed style” which later evolved to the fully completed style of German Baroque.

* that’s what makes me so mad at all those ignorant musicians who claim that we can play Baroque music as we please, because we have no information about the performance practice of the pre-recording times. Because we do have. A lot. More than enough for a lifetime to study. Every time I hear modern pianists and symphonic orchestras play Baroque, I cringe from pain. It should not be that way. Musicians should be educated about music before letting them play that music. I’m a firm believer of thorough education.

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